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Interiorssneak peeks

A Stately Family Abode in Baltimore

by Garrett Fleming

A blank canvas, no matter the size, can seem daunting. My humble home is a mere 700 square feet, and when it came time to decorate, I was a bit perplexed. At the time, it seemed like a lot of “look” to figure out. That being said, I can’t imagine decking out nearly 7,000 square feet. Knitting and craft designer Anne Weil and sports-analyst Sandy were faced with that very challenge when they moved into this Edwardian-style looker. Their 15-room home, located within walking distance to all that Baltimore, MD has to offer, is a master class in grandiose, traditional decorating.

The family let the architectural details, old-world charm and size influence their design decisions. After all, it was those very elements that sold them on the home. “Honestly, it felt straight out of a novel. It was the stuff of dreams and stories,” Anne gushes. Overall, the entire home was crafted to be warm and inviting, but each level did have a very specific design goal. The main floor’s decor was chosen because it complements the character and age of the space, while the second floor’s bedrooms reflect each family member’s personality. Anne’s home office was styled to foster her creativity and let her mind unwind and run wild with new designs.

Since it’s so easy on the eyes, you would think that Anne and Sandy would be most grateful for their home’s look, but that’s simply not the case. It’s the “loss and joy, discovery and change” that the family has experienced while living here that they will always remember. Click through to take a further look at the spot where Sandy pursued his dreams, Anne wrote her book, and their three kids grew up before their very eyes. Enjoy! —Garrett

Photography by Anne Weil and Jennifer Trovato. Design and Staging by Bari Fore of BTF Consulting at Henslee Conway.

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The main entry, painted in Benjamin Moore "Cos Cob Stonewall," is what sold Anne on the home. When you enter, you can see all the way out to the back doors. A consignment chandelier and table from Anne's aunt deck the space. Sandy and Anne love the front doors so much, they painted them a brilliant white to show them off.
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The raised parlor sits to the left of the entryway and is used primarily for entertaining guests.
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The fireplace's "quirky and stately" details always steal the show. Notice the angel wings carved into its sides and little golden feet at the base? I adore when something traditional can have a little wink like that. All of the room's furnishings are hand-me-downs, and the walls are painted in Benjamin Moore "Classic Gray."
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Despite being set up as a formal dining room, the Weils use this space on a daily basis. Having three kids means nothing can be too precious, so the family designed their home for both comfort and utility. Benjamin Moore "Winter Orchard" was used on the walls.
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Anne and Sandy had their table custom made, and it holds many special memories for the couple. Each of their three little ones took their first bites at this table, and "it carries all the scrapes, scratches, dings and stories of a growing family of five," Anne says. The koi painting is a Farrell Elizabeth Douglass original and on loan from their stager Bari Fore. The chairs and buffet are from Pottery Barn.
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Always packed with fibers and projects, this is the spot where Anne unwinds and lets her mind wander as she creates. Work by Lisa Congdon, Amber Alexander, Michelle Tavares, and Michelle Armas decorates the home studio's walls. The West Elm bench creates a cozy corner nook.
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Anne's new book "Knitting Without Needles" was conceived right here, and samples of her work adorn the room. Her desk is from IKEA.
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The airiness of the space lets her disconnect and "become absorbed in making."
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When Anne's aunt downsized, she gave Anne all of her furniture. The light colors of each piece paired with the brilliant sun that streams into the living room creates an ethereal hideaway.
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Knitter, photographer and author Anne Weil.
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The grand landing gets such great light, it serves as the perfect backdrop for Anne's Flax & Twine features. Sandy's dad gave the couple this antique, Caucasian Soumak rug.
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Anne knitted this throw herself, and the bed is flanked by two of her favorite prints by Emily Jeffords. The golden mirror was found at a thrift shop.
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The master bedroom's fireplace may not be functioning, but it adds such charm to the room that it hardly matters.
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The bathroom looks so stately now, that it's hard to imagine that it was once pink with fluorescent lights and crumbling molding. It's stunning how a coat of Benjamin Moore "Sabre Gray," a new shower head and mirror transformed the space.
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The oldest Weil child's love for geography, maps and history heavily influenced his bedroom's design. Benjamin Moore "Swiss Coffee" warms up the walls, and the rug is from One Kings Lane. Boulder Map Gallery makes the print, and the bed is from West Elm.
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He painted this canvas in first grade! All of the Weil children have a bold, artistic flair that their parents hope they never lose.
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The nightstand's birdcage has been with the second-eldest son since he was 4. Anne and Sandy love how their little guy "adores sports, reading and stuffed animals equally." Accessories from Target, a Room & Board chair and a West Elm bedding set adorn this kid's room. The dresser is secondhand.
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Her son's pillow was knitted without needles – Anne's specialty.
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The pouf and knitted pillow you see here in her daughter's bedroom are samples from Anne's upcoming book. A Lisa Congdon painting sits above the fireplace, and the bedding and bed are from IKEA.
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You can make this paper-flower wall installation yourself. Simply follow the steps on Anne's blog. The chair is from Pottery Barn Teen.
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After moving in, one of the couple's first undertakings was renovating the main kitchen. While it was under construction, this second kitchen served the family. It worked out so well, the main kitchen never did get the Anne and Sandy treatment. The rug is from One Kings Lane.
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Benjamin Moore "Simply White" now covers what was once a pink-and-brown nightmare.
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The home's original, Kitchener coal-burning stove.
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Anne's dream of a white-on-white kitchen was realized in the basement setup. These chairs are from West Elm, and the table was picked up at IKEA.
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The home's floor plan.

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Comments

  • Everything in this home is lovely! I especially love the yarn/knitting studio! But, the fact that you included the home’s address worries me! It’s on the floor plan photo, FYI

  • Such a tantalizing description of the gardens and yet no pictures!! I hope they feature it someday.

  • I love how this home’s “blank canvas” is so ornate, but most of the furniture and belongings are by comparison relatively humble, practical, and homey. It looks happily lived in, rather than overly decorated (which is so easy to do in large spaces and majestic old houses). They respected the original framework while creating a cozy and casual environment that suited their needs.

  • Holy cow. This house is amazing. I want alllll the rugs! I think the office and the dining room are my favorites. The vibe in the office is so organic and inspiring.
    I’m glad I dont have this many rooms to furnish, but the fact that so many of the furniture pieces here are hand me downs is wonderful :)

    -Mackenzie

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