In the Kitchen With: Kristen Beddard’s Salmon Cakes

In the Kitchen With: Kristen Beddard’s Salmon Cakes

Salmon Cakes by Kristen Beddard photography by Rebecca Genet | DesignSponge

When I was young, my father took care of me and my brother. He didn’t really know how to cook, so he used the Betty Crocker cookbook and recipes from the labels on the cans and boxes of food he bought. This recipe for Salmon Cakes with Homemade Tartar Sauce by Kristen Beddard, author of Bonjour Kale and founder of The Kale Project, takes me back to my childhood. These are made a bit like crab cakes — no filler. My father’s favorite dish to make was salmon cakes, but they were never this fancy! —Kristina

Why Kristen loves this recipe: I love entertaining, but sometimes the thought of planning, prepping, cooking and cleaning up can seem daunting. If I’m having a last-minute dinner party or Sunday brunch, these salmon cakes are my go-to. They are simple yet hands-on and can be prepared ahead of time, which means there is more time to be with your guests. The recipe pairs well with a fresh green salad and baguette and if you’re feeling up for it, a spicy Bloody Mary.

Bonjour Kale cover artwork | DesignSponge

Food Photography by Rebecca Genet | Portrait by Caitlin Riley | Book cover artwork by Jessie Kanelos-Weiner
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10 of Our Favorite Portland, OR Homes

Jaclyn Campanaro Embraces A Stormy Hue In Her Portland Bungalow on Design*Sponge

10 of Our Favorite Portland, OR Homes

Whether or not you believe Portlandia (which locals tend to love-to-hate) that Portland, OR is where young people go to retire, there’s no doubting that “the rose city” attracts creative types. Their homes tend to double as workspaces, be reflections of their creative outlets and otherwise boost that imaginative spirit. Having grown up in a small town in Oregon, south of Portland, it was always the “cool” big city where the best concerts were, where all the good shopping was, where fresh and innovative ideas were born — and it’s also one of the best big cities in Oregon for proximity to snow, surf, and mountains. Portland is also a town that’s all about comfort: in Portland you can find some of the best doughnuts (feel free to debate in the comments about whether you’re Pip’s, Voodoo, or Blue Star kind-of folk), restaurants famous for their biscuits or unique ice cream flavors, one of the biggest independent book stores in the country, and coffee. All the coffee.

So, slip on your favorite wooly socks and Berks, grab a ceramic mug filled with your favorite coffee and curl up to see 10 of our favorite Portland homes. —Rebekah

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10 Indoor + Outdoor Favorites at Terrain

I've gotten really into container gardening this year, primarily because so much of our soil is rocky and it's been hard to break it up for flower or vegetable gardens. So this striped planter feels like a nice way to add some color and life to a little corner of the back patio or at the top of the porch steps.  $128 right here.

10 Indoor + Outdoor Favorites at Terrain

Because Julia and I both have been on book tours this fall, I’ve been focusing on spending time outside when I’m home in between events. I’ve missed out on fall favorites like planting cabbages and making wreaths, so I made sure to dedicate all my free time in the months before tour to keeping things green and growing outside. With all my visits on tour to the southsouthwest and the west coast, I’ve been enjoying pleasant fall weather — and it’s still nice enough at home to hang outside. So just because we’re entering cooler seasons doesn’t mean I’m ready to head indoors or stop dreaming about our gardening plans for next year.

From planters of thyme to our surprisingly successful first crop of tomatoes and eggplants, I’ve so enjoyed all the results of our hard work outside over the past year. Next year I want to put even more time into our yard, so I’ve been eyeing some new pieces at my favorite gardening shop, Terrain, to keep me motivated for planting and planning next year’s lineup. If you’re looking to do a little fall growing, sprucing up or just planning for next spring’s plants, hopefully these 10 pieces will keep you growing in stylexo, grace

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Before & After: An Airstream Trailer In Seattle Gets a Complete Makeover

Before and After: An Airstream In Seattle Gets a Complete Makeover

Before & After: An Airstream Trailer In Seattle Gets a Complete Makeover

Living an in alternative home might not be for everyone, but for Natasha Lawyer and Brett Bashaw, renovating and living in a 1972 31-foot Airstream Sovereign has only brought them closer (no, really, they share 200 square feet). “We started with our mutual desire to see the country,” Natasha recalls. “Last year my husband Brett and I bought a 1978 Volkswagen van, converted it into a camper, put everything we owned in storage and handed back the keys to our apartment. We traveled for six months living inside our Volkswagen which we christened with the name ‘Wes Vanderson.’ We began by crossing Canada from West to East, ending in Newfoundland and then headed South entering back into the United States in Maine and continuing our journey through the States. We loved the alternative way of living, and as our trip started winding down, we began talking about how we could live differently when we returned home. After such a transformational trip we didn’t want to simply return to regular life as it was before, as though our amazing journey never happened. We got the idea of renovating an Airstream to live in from lovely nomadic Insta-friends, Birch and Pine and started planning for it during the tail-end of our van trip. Eventually we sold our van through our Instagram account, bought a tow vehicle for our pending Airstream purchase, and headed back to Seattle. We purchased a gutted Airstream in Portland on the way home and started work on it in February of this year.”

Natasha and Brett have scrubbed, primed, painted and installed to transform their Airstream into a beautiful home for them, their two dogs and 59 plants! Taking Natasha’s art background and mixing it with her two years as a display designer for Anthropologie, the couple had the ground work for diving into the renovations. “We had Natasha’s Dad come help put up walls, wire, and guide us in the plumbing of the Airstream and then we started on cabinets,” they tell us. “When we moved in here, we had no running water, but after living in a van for six months it just felt like so much space for us! Since February we’ve gradually put up walls, built a closet, got the water running, installed a toilet and sink, built cabinetry, a daybed, added shelving, tiled a backsplash, whitewashed walls, installed fixtures, and have continued to add to our home by planting a container garden and building a patio outside. We’re eight months in and we’re about 75% finished at this point. As we’ve started wrapping up most of the major work on the interior, Brett has begun working on the exterior; buffing the aluminum to a mirror shine.”

I hope you enjoy this makeover as much as we do. It’s truly a beautiful transformation to take a gutted, moldy Airstream and turn it into a warm and inviting home. —Erin

Photography by Natasha Lawyer

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12 Everyday Craft Supplies and Fun Projects to Make With Them

12 Everyday Craft Supplies and Projects to Make With Them, on Design*Sponge

12 Everyday Craft Supplies and Fun Projects to Make With Them

As holiday season approaches, many of us are conjuring up clever craft projects with which to decorate our homes and add some festive cheer. More often than not, an extensive shopping list manifests from these brainstorming sessions. If you’d rather save some change, check out these 12 fantastic (and seasonally-appropriate) DIY projects from the archives that make use of stuff — like cookie cutters, napkins, and printer paper — that most of us already have lying handily around the house. —Annie

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DIY Otomi-Inspired Pumpkin

DIY Otomi-Inspired Pumpkin

DIY Otomi-Inspired Pumpkin on Design*Sponge

Carving pumpkins for Halloween has got to be one of my favorite traditions. Growing up, I always put a lot of thought into exactly what design (almost always a face) I would choose. It’s probably a good thing that Pinterest wasn’t around back then, because I’d be contemplating my options for hours!

DIY Otomi-Inspired Pumpkin on Design*Sponge

Recently I’ve been seeing more and more Otomi-inspired textiles online, and I was curious to learn more about its history. Otomi textiles began as embroidered fabric in central Mexico, in which silhouettes of animals and plants were embroidered with a satin stitch onto fabric, often in bright colors. It’s possible that the traditional designs were inspired by prehistoric cave paintings, but experts can’t be certain. Do an online image search and you’ll see pages and pages of beautiful, traditional Otomi textiles and more recent Otomi-inspired prints. I decided this would be the perfect inspiration for my pumpkin carving this year — click through to see more photos and instructions! —Kathleen
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10 Statement Earrings for Fall

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10 Statement Earrings for Fall

A few weeks ago I was talking to Jessica Murnane on her podcast about how little time I put into anything related to my wardrobe, hair or makeup. I’m usually 100% fine with that, but with my ongoing book tour, I needed to pull it together a bit. I was talking with my mother-in-law about what would work best for traveling and still feeling professional and presentable (I don’t think my typical dog-walking shorts will do it), and we both agreed that keeping things simple and focusing on a strong piece of jewelry would be a great idea.

I’ve always felt comfortable in something more uniform-like, so I hunted down a handful of simple black outfits I can wear and then a few pairs of awesome statement earrings that work well with my short hair and make me feel “dressed up” enough to honor these special events. I thought I’d share my favorites here today and see if they’re anyone else’s cup of tea. If anyone gets one of these pairs and comes to the book tour events, come find me! We should definitely take a twin-earring picture ;) xo, grace

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Shop Tour: Hold General Store

Shop Tour: Hold General Store, Design*Sponge

Shop Tour: Hold General Store

When Marla Ebell was younger, she used to help her grandparents harvest and sell organic vegetables from their farm. She’d wrap the precious goods in paper and string before market days, all the while dreaming of one day owning her own general store. If she had her way, she’d become the purveyor of “morally-beautiful products.” Those hopes and wishes never wavered, and today they’ve become the backbone of Hold General Store, the result of all of Marla’s dreaming and scheming.

The store in Victoria, Canada carries a range of diverse products simple in their design and look. They aren’t flashy with in-your-face colors and patterns. Instead they are streamlined and pretty, perfect for seamlessly fitting into anyone’s home. Peppered amongst brooms and bowls are nods to Marla’s time on the vegetable farm: greenery that tastes as fresh as it looks. All in all, Marla says Hold General Store is a one-stop shop for building a life beautiful in its singularity. “Its about treasuring simplicity, noticing the small things, filling your home with tools you cherish and allow[ing] their stories to integrate into your everyday,” she tells us.

Each product Marla carries has clearly been carefully chosen. That being said, her wares couldn’t be displayed on any old, store-bought furniture. Instead, these items reside on tables and benches made of wood salvaged from British Columbia’s coastline. Even better, Marla’s family and friends helped her make the pieces, each one adding warmth to a space already full of such thoughtfulness and care. Click through to hear more from Marla and to take a closer look around the space. Enjoy!  —Garrett

Photography by Kelly Brown

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The Beauty of Self-Care Lesson 6: Celebrate Your Strengths

The Beauty of Self-Care Lesson 6: Celebrate Your Strengths

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Sometimes the hardest part of self-care, for me, is simply staying in the moment and accepting things as they’re happening as-is. That generally means building a tolerance for pain as it transforms into something neutral. But what if it meant sitting with empowering things that are unique to you? What if it meant having some innate super-powers you could turn on or off and adjust the power level of at will? About two years ago, I set out to make that scheme a reality, not just for me, but for my family. I’m neuroatypical and had read enough brain science books to know it was quite possible for me to “adjust” my brain and thinking more effectively if I turned it into a tactile experience. So I designed a console that allowed me to do just that. And it worked.

I didn’t realize at the time that I was actually applying design theory to a problem in my life much like the techniques in the book Designing Your Life that I talked about last week.

Negative feelings demand to be recognized. They demand to be invited in for tea and conversation. But that’s not so fun for us. They’re bad guests and tend to monopolize the conversation. Funny thing is, once you let them have their dramatic monologue, they fall quiet. So it’s really a matter of tolerance and endurance for their hosts — us.

I always thought meditation was about escape because I had mastered the great escape from a lot of important things in my life that left me uncomfortable. For the first two years of meditating nearly every day, I felt like I was simply escaping from the current pressure of the day. It still makes me smile realizing that I was doing the exact opposite without even knowing it — I was sitting and having tea with negativity. I thought it was guilt for not being productive at that very moment. Nope. Negativity is a master at disguises. That way, it can shape-shift into so many different things that your brain gets tired and just ends up interpreting it as a general malaise, heavy with the weight of thousand worries.

Knowing that you have as many positive traits as the negative has disguises turns you into a pillar of strength that can sit tall at tea time. Yes, it’s a chore (at first), but wow, what a difference giving it a place at the table makes. You’ll find that negativity stopped ringing the doorbell multiple times a day! Click through to find out how to identify your top five strengths so you can harness them and let them hold you up when you’re in need of some extra support. –Caitlin

Illustration above: Elephant Strength by Penelope Dullaghan | Available in her Etsy Shop here

Please join us and our collaborator, Aveda, each Tuesday at 1 pm for some self-exploration + exercises to build good habits and instill positive self-care into your everyday routine. We couldn’t be more thrilled to work on this content side-by-side with a company that shares our values and has such a thoughtful approach to self-care and beauty.

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How To Innovate & Design Your Life By Creating Mind Maps

How To Innovate & Design Your Life By Creating Mind Maps

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Last week we took a peek inside the new bestseller, Designing Your Life. I heard from many of you in the comment section that you were at an open point in your life, waiting to discover, but wanting to design, what’s next in your life. Today’s exercise from the book will help you push aside the negative, hyper-realistic thoughts that crush ideas as they come up in your brain while you’re wishful thinking or daydreaming. This exercise is built around ideation and you are expected and encouraged to come up with fantastic ideas, so bring on the wishful thinking and the daydreams.

At my last corporate job as the Marketing Director for a legacy newspaper, we called these type of exercise sessions BHAG meetings — BHAG standing for Big Hairy Audacious Goals. The gloom and doom of being a print publication in the digital age was especially heavy in this outfit at the time because they had recently retired an onsite printing press that had been operating since the 1950s. It was more cost effective to outsource the printing process to another location with a newer press than to keep this huge, beautiful, but aging, machine in operation. In fact, the modernist building that housed the newspaper was built around the press, with two-story glass windows facing the street where the press could be seen and admired by passing cars and pedestrians. When the press was in operation, you could hear the steady hum of the machine throughout the building. It was the sound of success, of pride and of freedom. Needless to say, when that sound disappeared, morale went with it.

I loved BHAG meetings. I was always the annoying one that would arrive early, grab a spot next to the white board and get pumped up with game show glee. After the press stopped, we met to brainstorm about how to boost morale and community interest in the company, and to just fight our way out of the grave. I suggested we start a TV station. And I suggested that we place it exactly where the press had been, where it would be visible from the street. You can imagine the looks around the conference table and the silence in the room.

Cut to a year later — the TV station is thriving, providing a welcome alternative to the local TV news station who produced all of their news from the newspaper’s stories. They’ve built a local audience, gained market share, successfully boosted their advertising all while having quality digital content for their website. Boom. And all because some annoying lady began to scribble on the whiteboard.

Click through for a five-minute exercise from Designing Your Life that will help you think out of the box, dream a little, and up your happy factor for the day. –Caitlin

This post is brought to you in collaboration with Designing Your Life. All words and experiences are my own and I highly recommend this book as a tool for moving forward into a thoughtful, considered life that you’ve designed.

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A Touch of European Design Amps Up a Nashville Rental

A Touch of European Design Amps Up a Nashville Rental, Design*Sponge

A Touch of European Design Amps Up a Nashville Rental

Decorating can sometimes get complicated. It can get in its own way with wallpapers, accessories, furniture — the works. Other times you come across homes that are so sparse, they seem unlivable. Finding that perfect in-between seems to be the right move, but it’s not always easy to achieve. However, Doug and Carina Jenkins, the antiquing duo behind Eneby Home, have done just that. They moved into their Nashville, TN rental two years ago and have since gone about decorating it in a streamlined fashion with European antiquities they’ve picked up on their travels there.

The space is not big on bold hues and bright accents. Instead it’s rich in earth tones and lived-in leathers, both of which give it a level of comfort and calm perfect for the couple and their two young daughters. Doug tells us this unfussy design was all in the plan. “We just wanted a home that was functional. Comfort is key with kids and us old folks. We wanted it to be easy on the eyes and full of character, but it [had] to be comfortable,” he says. Luckily, the pair was able to achieve this with some of their most beloved vintage finds, and they are extremely happy with the look they’ve landed on. That’s not to say they won’t switch it up from time to time. That’s just the reality when you’ve got a home run by two antique dealers. So take a peek at this home, stat. It’s bound to look different — albeit just as fabulous — tomorrow. Enjoy! —Garrett

Photography by Gregg Roth

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Built in the 1830s, a Designer’s Cozy & Curated Cottage

Built in the 1830s, a Designer's Cozy & Curated Cottage, Design*Sponge

Built in the 1830s, a Designer’s Cozy & Curated Cottage

As a boy, Barry Jordan – the mastermind behind William and Edward Mercantile – loved to draw and paint. Being creative simply came naturally to him. Another passion did as well: farming. The family plot in Northumberland, England where he grew up had his heart, and it was in his blood to be outside working on projects, making the most of the day. There came a time, though, when Barry had to choose between art and farming. It was bittersweet, but as he came of age he left the farm to study and work in fashion design in London and then New York City, two places that couldn’t be more different from where he grew up.

After years of living and working in Manhattan, however, Barry grew restless and began to long for the simpler lifestyle he once had back in England. He needed to get back to farming and the connection with nature that he remembered from his childhood. All in all, he was very homesick. To help with this, he went out and bought himself a fixer-upper cottage in quiet Dutchess County, NY. The 1830s-era cottage had been in the previous owner’s family for 150 years when Barry took it over, and the work it needed was a little intimidating. But Barry wanted a project, and since buying it he’s turned the space into a rustic, warm retreat for himself and his friends.

Barry did the majority of the work solo — yes, solo. It was a labor love and one that he enjoyed every second of. “The overall feeling as I started stripping the house back [was that] it was guiding me, and it cooperated with each turn,” he explains. No matter the undertaking, the house just worked out. The original beams he uncovered after a ceiling renovation were stunning, a second bathroom’s necessary location just happened to align with the original plumbing, and the list goes on.

On a roll, Barry then went about decking the halls and filling the cottage with hearty antiquities and sentimental decorations. White china tossed messily in an open cupboard and a draping Union Jack give the space Victorian charm while also reminding him of home. They are joined not only by flea market finds, but the lucky Craigslist gem, too. Clearly it doesn’t matter to Barry where his home’s decor came from. Barry says the key to achieving his decorating style is instead “… to find pieces that were once loved, need a new home and have a sense of time about them.” Click through to see all he’s collected and all of the fabulous work he’s done bringing a bit of England to NY for himself. Enjoy! —Garrett

Photography by Barry Jordan

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10 Amazing Wallpapered Entryways

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10 Amazing Wallpapered Entryways

In terms of design, we naturally tend to focus our efforts on rooms that we spend most of our time in. Entryways often get neglected for the very same reason that makes them design opportunities — they’re areas that we mainly pass through. These smaller spaces are where first impressions are made, and there’s always room to add some personality!

An entryway can portray your personal design aestehtic in a nutshell, or it can be an inspiring prelude to what’s around the corner. It can also be a standalone statement that will leave your guests smiling every time they walk through the door. There are so many great ways to brighten up entryways, and wallpaper is definitely high on the list. Grace recently shared some thoughts on revamping her own entryway with some colorful wallpaper, and the rest of the team is equally inspired. To share the love, here’s a look into some of our favorite wallpapered entryways! — Sofia

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An Oklahoma Lake Home Where Life Is Slower

The Shingleton Vacation Home Tour for Design*Sponge

An Oklahoma Lake Home Where Life Is Slower

Rachel and Simon Shingleton met in first grade. They went to grade school and high school together and later fell in love while attending the same college. In 2008 they welcomed their son Jude into their Oklahoma City life. Rachel, a graphic designer, blogs about design, décor, and style at Pencil Shavings Studio and Simon works as a Realtor. In 2011 Rachel expanded her blog to include both a product line and an online shop. Then came a series of miscarriages. And with them the loss of hope of having another child. By this time Jude was six and Rachel had fallen in love with a vacation home on Lake Eufaula, a couple of hours from the city. A new build, it was a shell of a building, with walls and little else, but Rachel knew immediately the soaring ceilings and wide open floor plan would be perfect for hosting family gatherings. And she loved that the bedrooms were tucked away upstairs under the eaves. Though their family of three was not what Rachel and Simon had envisioned, they decided to buy the two-bedroom home. Then, the weekend the family moved in, Rachel noticed she felt funny.

On a whim she took a pregnancy test. It was positive. “I couldn’t believe that on the weekend we moved into a TWO-BEDROOM house it turned out we’d be adding another baby to the family,” Rachel shares. Now their family of four, with the addition of son Archer, enjoys weekends and summers at the lake in Carlton Landing. The cottage is located in a rural part of Oklahoma where the cell reception is spotty and there are no street lights, resulting in a night sky ablaze with stars. Rachel and family like swimming and kayaking and sharing meals with neighbors on the wooden boardwalk in front of their home until it’s too dark to see one’s fork and plate. But it’s the simple things they were craving when they bought the home that now mean the most, says Rachel: “the warmth of the sun on our backs at the lake, gently swinging on the porch in the breeze, the sound of the rain on the metal roof, and watching the way the water changes colors out on the lake.”

The family just finished their third summer on Lake Eufaula and Rachel says the house is only now starting to feel lived in. Though Rachel is quick to add she loves the gradual process of layering a home with authenticity. And why rush? The Shingleton vacation home is a place that invites one to move more slowly and with more intention. It may be that as Rachel takes her time transforming the home, it is in some way also transforming her. In 2015, after much introspection, Rachel decided to close her online shop. She did it to reduce her work hours, so she’d have more time with Archer. And because when she made a list of all the things that brought her joy, blogging and design were at the top, and running her online shop was at the bottom. Now in the midst of what she calls a creative sabbatical, Rachel is excited to see where her love of blogging, writing, designing, and interiors will take her. It’s what happens, writes poet Wendell Berry, when we “come into the peace of wild things…and into the presence of still water…For a time I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.” —Liberty 

Photography by Rachel Shingleton

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Lessons Cancer Taught Me + Best of the Web

Lessons Cancer Taught Me + Best of the Web

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In March of this year as I showered one day, I found a lump in my neck. *Pop!* Overnight, it was there. It sounds strange, but I immediately knew something was wrong. I can’t tell you why, but something inside me just kept saying, “This is bad.” A week passed and no change. Concerned, I started seeing doctors and was told several times that I had a bacterial infection and they’d soon cure it. But my lymph nodes weren’t slowing down. A week or so later on my morning commute, I casually itched my neck. Two more lumps. Anxiously I texted a friend, hiding behind sunglasses in hopes of covering up my tears. What was happening to my body? Why so fast? I wanted time to stop. To rewind. Luckily, my medical team quickly found out I had a very aggressive, yet thankfully very curable, form of lymphoma. Teary-eyed, I asked the doctors what lymphoma was, unclear about my diagnosis. Blood cancer. That’s what it was.

Now that I’m halfway through treatment, those first few days after being diagnosed feel like a lifetime ago; feel like another me. I’m handling chemotherapy well though, and thankfully it’s extremely likely I’ll be in remission around New Year’s. I often daydream about that day, curious as to how I’ll react when I hear the news. Part of me is fearful to go alone because if it’s positive, I want a big celebratory hug. But I also fear I’ll still have tumors and that I’ll disappoint anyone that comes with me to the appointment. This last bit may sound strange, and to be totally honest, I wasn’t expecting to feel that way either. At this point, I should know better, though. The journey I’m on to recovery has me feeling all sorts of new things and keeps throwing me for a loop at every turn. Some days are tough, but on the plus side, every day it reveals to me something about myself, true love and mortality that I hadn’t known before. Cancer’s taken so much from me, the least I can do is take these lessons from it in return. So thank you, lymphoma. Thank you for all you’ve taught me.

Accepting Love without Conditions: There are times I feel so guilty for being ill. There are even moments when I want to keep how I’m emotionally or physically handling my cancer a secret, sure it will keep my closest family and friends from worrying all night. But they just keep trucking along with me, and I’ve come to realize that I don’t always have to be the happy-go-lucky Garrett. I can be the sick Garrett, the sad Garrett and the meditative Garrett I naturally am, and they’ll still be there to help me fight. You’re always stronger when you let others in and allow yourself to bask in unconditional love.

Focusing on the Now: Cancer is not just about going in for chemotherapy. There are probably a dozen appointments in-between each treatment. And each one has the potential to derail your ever-tentative recovery calendar. Cardiologists, ophthalmologists, the works. I hadn’t realized prior to my diagnosis how vital and intertwined the lymphatic system and the rest of your body truly are. I never know what my next appointment will hold and I often lie awake at night wondering what the doctors will say. I’m learning to live in the moment, though. NOW I feel good. NOW I have energy. NOW I can go shopping when I want. I’m currently feeling the best I have since I started, and I’m determined to not worry about the rug being pulled out from under me.

To Feel is Not to Be Weak: In our hyper-masculine culture, us men are taught not to cry. Be tough. To those who say, “Man up,” I say eff off. I cry. I cry a lot. And I’m learning not to feel bad about it. I feel better for it actually. There were times not long ago when I would hide away in the guest bathroom late at night, sobbing into tissue. The release is a much needed catharsis I didn’t want to bother anyone else with. “They need sleep,” I’d tell myself. “Don’t bother them.” As I get more comfortable showing how cancer is truly affecting me, I’m also learning how lucky I am to have those that let me feel without judgement. They’re truly teaching me to be at one with my feelings. —Garrett

 

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  • Treat Your Feet: The latest footwear collection by SoukBohemian features patterns in rust, black and white hues. Plus, they’re all handmade by Mexican artisans.
  • Fall Cooking: I tried out this parmesan-roasted acorn squash recipe this week, and whoa, was it delicious.
  • Kitchen Refresh: Friend to D*S, Dabito of Old Brand New recently renovated his Aunt’s kitchen and the plant-filled, sunshiny results have me missing summer.
  • Handmade Halloween Treats: It’s never too early for a little Halloween sugar rush. These homemade Butterfingers taste almost exactly like the real thing. The secret? Melted candy corn.
  • Mid-Century Must-Have: Other Times Vintage is a fabulous go-to for all manner of vintage decor. This pair of mid-century cowhide sofas takes the cake. Now if I could only find a spot for them in my new apartment…
  • Daily Affirmations: Alexandra Smith’s Instagram is not only a beautifully-curated peek inside her life as a mother and wife, but it’s also peppered with inspiring, self-affirming poetry and tidbits sure to put a swagger back in your step when you’re feeling a bit low.

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