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Design from A to ZInteriors

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug

by Garrett Fleming

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge

The oldest rug fragments and mentions of their use date back to 4,000 BC, an era when, according to evidence, a flat weave was the choice design. Oftentimes parents and their children would not only use it as a bed, but to keep warm in the winter and to sit on while working. Because of its myriad uses, a home’s carpet was considered a family’s most prized possession.

Similar to the families that came before them, modern homeowners have durability on the brain when they head out to hunt down a rug of their own. Lately though, due to increased access, affordability and supply, a rug’s style is arguably more important (to many) than how long it will last. And we are not complaining! Over the years the talented homeowners whose spaces we’ve featured have taken risks with their carpets, tracked down unique varieties and chosen to go bold with texture and color in a way we can’t help but applaud. That being said, you simply have to scroll down to check out the varied ways the homes we’ve peeked inside have put to use one of decor’s original staples. And when you’re done, be sure to check out the world’s oldest rug here. Enjoy! —Garrett

P.S. Check out the rest of our Design from A to Z series here.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
1/10

Art has always influenced interior decor. The latest trend we are seeing bleed over is a use of abstract shapes and forms like those featured on the Cold Picnic rug seen here in this installation artist’s home.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
2/10

Animal print rugs have always been en vogue, but when everyone’s going cowhide, why not go spotted? Katie Vail’s home proves the pattern works just as well as its more popular brethren.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
3/10

Australian artist Silvia Rotundo and husband Frank’s home features this rug of the scallop variety, a great alternative to chevron.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
4/10

Long before a life in Kenya was on the horizon, Ashleigh and Andrew got this West African bakuba rug as a wedding gift. “Who knew it would make it (back) to Africa?!” Ashleigh exclaims.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
5/10

This Victorian carriage house’s neon accessories are so fabulous, the homeowner cleverly paired them with a neutral rug so they’d get all the attention they deserve.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
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If you’re not feeling stripes, a more loose, multicolored option like Stephanie’s rug could be just what you need.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
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Larger rugs can get pricey fast. Thrifty homeowners know, though, that layering two smaller options together can give the same effect of one big rug and cost much less. Oftentimes we see this done with cowhides and turkish kilims or two rugs of the same shape. Ingenious homeowners Claire and Dave Mandell gave their front porch a unique twist by pairing a runner with a square rug.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
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In a sea of kilim and ikat rugs, more offbeat patterns like this one on Hanna and Dustin’s porch are always refreshing.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
9/10

The neon pink in this rug by Coco Carpets (that sits in Light Lab’s studio) is so eyecatching it almost seems retouched. It’s a statement, indeed.

Design from A to Z: R is for Rug, Design*Sponge
10/10

Some of the best rugs come with a story. Lindsey Smith’s pixelated floral rug, for example, was from a dear friend. She says, “To me, it is a sort of visual representation of her wild and colorful spirit. I love the daily reminder of our companionship.”

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