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In North Texas, a Maximalist’s Layered Bohemian Home

by Garrett Fleming

Judy Aldridge wears many hats. She’s a mom, blogger, photographer and entrepreneur. With that in mind, it comes as no surprise that her North Texas home is as layered as she is. Her house’s look is maximalist in nature, with pattern, antiquities and a massive collection of artwork providing the basis for its design. A conscious disregard for whether or not certain pieces were meant to live together or are considered complementary further defines her bold, bohemian style.

What’s most impressive about the bohemian look is how affordable it was to achieve. What looks to be a collection of goods from far-off casbahs and dusty French shops is actually a clever balancing act. Yes, there are several heirloom antiquities peppered throughout the space, but it’s also comprised of many pieces from the nearby Salvation Army. The cost-saving shop has lent the home some enviable seating and decorations. All it took was a little patience and some perseverance on Judy’s part. She’s always got her eyes peeled for great finds, and it has paid off.

The backdrop to these Salvation Army finds and fabulous antiques is a collection of artwork unlike any I’ve seen in a private home. Monkeys in fruit hats, evocative portraits and fashion sketches are just a couple of the fun pieces that her walls boast. Each work of art is so unique, you’d think the pieces are here to stay. Judy’s not one to let a look get stale, though, and her treasure trove of artwork is too abundant to allow that to happen. With a library of art in storage waiting to be hung, she’s able to rotate in new pieces every now and then to periodically freshen each room.

With pieces coming and going, the home never looks quite the same from one day to the next, but each new iteration is a literal eye-spy of great decor. That being said, there is no way you can absorb the entire space in one sitting, so be sure to bookmark this one. You’ll uncover something else to love about the maximalist, bohemian home each time you revisit it. Click through and enjoy! —Garrett

Photography by Jane Aldridge

In North Texas, a Maximalist's Layered Bohemian Home, Design*Sponge
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A tapestry by Ana Piksiades makes the entryway -- in my opinion -- the most memorable spot in the home. Judy found it at Scout Design Studio. Vintage finds sit below it on a floor made of polished concrete that Judy and her sister installed themselves. The floors were perfect for when she had daughters running around the house making messes, and they're still invaluable. They're so durable she can drag furniture around and restyle her house without making a single scuff.
In North Texas, a Maximalist's Layered Bohemian Home, Design*Sponge
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Judy has lived in her North Texas home for 12 years, and owes its cozy, bohemian vibe to her inability to say "no" to a vintage, colorful decoration. Now that she's an empty nester, she has taken the chance to fully display all of her finds and fill each room with color, patterns and texture.
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Many guests assume Judy's headboards are from some far-off place, but she found them right in the heart of Dallas at Antiques Moderne. They're wooden and covered in paper mache.
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The white peacock chair visually recedes, letting her desk area's global accessories steal the show.
In North Texas, a Maximalist's Layered Bohemian Home, Design*Sponge
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The dining room never looks the same for too long thanks to Judy's rotating collection of vintage portraits. She has such a large collection in storage, she's able to swaps pieces out whenever she wants to mix things up. The Heywood Wakefield wicker chairs were a lucky Salvation Army find.
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Two archways -- the second lives to the left of frame, just out of view -- let the living and dining rooms have their own distinctive footprint yet still connect them to one another. This keeps the flow of the home uninterrupted.
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Last year, Judy made over her living room with thrift store finds from the Salvation Army and Genesis Benefit Thrift Store.
In North Texas, a Maximalist's Layered Bohemian Home, Design*Sponge
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Pillows from her travels to Guatemala sit atop her sofa, "Gina," and other vintage accessories give the space the layered look Judy has always coveted.
In North Texas, a Maximalist's Layered Bohemian Home, Design*Sponge
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The open kitchen's clean, white look makes it a stand-out amongst the layered, colorful rooms that surround it.
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A dreamy loft space sits at the top of the stairs. Spots like these are perfect for catching up with her daughters when they come back home to visit. The daybed from Dallas showroom Again & Again is one of Judy's favorite pieces, primarily because it's so easy to restyle... again and again.
In North Texas, a Maximalist's Layered Bohemian Home, Design*Sponge
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Judy's daughters don't live with her anymore, but that doesn't mean they don't need a spot to sleep in when they come to visit. In one of the guest rooms, her daughter Carol's old bed frame sits in front of an artistic accent wall. At first blush, its collection of vintage artwork looks serious, but take a closer peek and you'll find a monkey in a headdress.
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The 1970s-era home has two stories and nine rooms.
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The home is just under 2,000 square feet.

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