DIY

How To Safely Pack for the Beach + DIY Luggage Tag

by Caitlin Kelch

Featured-Image
It’s mid-July already, and for those of us who haven’t taken a getaway yet: what are we waiting for? Whether you’re boarding a plane in search of a beach, or heading to your local pool, it’s fun to get excited about any time for yourself to relax. Making sure your suitcase or bag is labeled with contact information so it can be returned to you if it’s lost is important, but taking care not to put too much information on your luggage or bag tag is crucial. Anyone can use the information on your tag to identify you, your phone number and your address. And they know that you’re not at home.

We’ve created a simple 10-minute Luggage Tag DIY to get you in a beachy mood using some of our favorite summery fabric and ribbon from the Waverly Inspirations collection. Make this for yourself, or family and friends who are about to embark on an adventure. There are also three essential safety tips to make sure your bag can be returned to you if it’s lost, while ensuring that your privacy won’t be taken advantage of or invaded. Check it all out after the jump, along with some of our favorite fabric + suitcase combos for your luggage tag! —Caitlin

*This post is brought to you in collaboration with Waverly Inspirations. This project, ideas, and words are from us here at D*S and were created by us,  for you! Thanks for supporting our sponsors that help us create & publish original content three times per day. The Waverly Inspirations collection is available at Walmart.

Three tips for luggage tag or bag I.D. safety:

  1. Create a separate email account just for lost-and-found situations. If you already have a promotions email account, that can work, too. Do not put your personal email address on your bag or suitcase I.D. Ever.
  2. Only include your cell phone number on your I.D. tag. Don’t include your landline or work telephone number since both could lead to your home address.
  3. There’s no need to include your first name on your luggage or bag tag. Simply putting your last name allows any transportation company or airline to match your name up with their passenger manifest.

As for packing for a weekend getaway or a two-week vacation, we can’t recommend this enough — ROLL your clothes to save space in your suitcase and to prevent wrinkles or creases. This works – especially if you keep your wardrobe choices to knits and cotton. If you pack other fabrics more likely to wrinkle, fold them, and lay them on top of your rolled items. Lay plastic bags or a dry cleaning bag on top of your rolled clothes. The plastic will allow the folded items to move a little which (fingers crossed) will keep creases to a minimum.

If you arrive at your destination and your chosen ensemble has a few wrinkles, hang your clothes in the bathroom while you take a shower as hot as is comfortable for you and shut the door. The steam generated by the shower helps take out any lingering wrinkles.

If you have more awesome packing tips or horror stories to help us avoid catastrophes, TELL US in the comments! Now onto some inspiration. We decided on Waverly’s colorful sea vegetables print to go with a red suitcase, but we had some other favorite choices and color combos.

We love this deep pool blue fabric from Waverly Inspirations with this vintage suitcase from Etsy.

We love this deep pool blue fabric from Waverly Inspirations with this vintage suitcase from Etsy.

This Waverly Inspirations orange and mint striped fabric reminds us of the awnings on patios. A DIY luggage tag would look amazing on this orange vintage luggage set.

This Waverly Inspirations orange and mint striped fabric reminds us of the awnings on patios. A DIY luggage tag would look amazing on this orange vintage luggage set.

For the jet-setter, this sunny yellow Waverly print + matching grosgrain scalloped ribbon would look snazzy with this yellow carry-on. The bright red crinoline pom pom breaks up the yellow factor.

For the jet-setter, this sunny yellow Waverly print + matching grosgrain scalloped ribbon would look snazzy with this yellow carry-on. The bright red crinoline pom pom breaks up the yellow factor. Now let’s get started with our DIY!

Luggage-Tag-1

Materials

  • Scissors
  • Fabric + Ribbon (We used Waverly Inspirations fabric available here.)
  • Card Stock or Thin Cardboard
  • Glue (Spray Adhesive, Glue Gun, Elmers will all work — just allow for dry time!)
  • Extra Fine Point Permanent Marker
  • Brayer or Rolling Pin or Long Bottle
  • Self-Adhesive Laminate Sheets
  • Hole Punch
  • Grommets + Grommet tools + Hammer (optional)

2-+-CardSt

Step 1: Decide what size tag works best for your bag. If you’re traveling by plane and checking your bag, a larger tag works best to identify your suitcase at baggage claim. Cut a card stock rectangle to your desired size. Draw a line across the width of the rectangle where you’d like your point to begin, then draw a vertical line in the middle of that line. Starting from each side of your horizontal line, cut up towards the middle of the vertical line, making a point.

Step 2: Cut two rectangles of the fabric the size of your card stock rectangle + 1/2 inch on all sides. You’ll trim this later.

Attach-Fabric

Step 3: Using your glue or adhesive, cover one side of your card stock shape. Place it on one of the reverse sides of the fabric. Run over it with a rolling tool to make sure there are no wrinkles in the fabric-to-paper adhesion. Cover the other side of the card stock with glue and place the second fabric rectangle right side up on top of of the card stock. Use a rolling tool again!

Name-Plate

Step 4: On a small piece of card stock (we used paint chips!), write out your limited contact information in permanent ink. Use a tiny bit of glue to hold it in place while you laminate. Place the fabric cover tag with your contact info face down on the sticky side of clear laminate. Use a rolling tool again to work out any wrinkles to the edges! Add another sheet of laminate on top of the tag. Repeat the rolling. Once both sides of your fabric tag are covered with the clear laminate, run your index finger around the edges of the fabric-covered card stock to create a tight seal. Cut the laminate in the shape of the tag, leaving a 1/4″ from the fabric tag’s edge.

Grommets

Step 5: If you’re adding a grommet, gather your tools, punch your hole and follow the instructions on your grommet kit. You can also just use a hole punch to create a hole for your ribbon to attach to your bag. Another method is to gently use the tip of a sharp knife to create a hole that you can maneuver your scissor tips into to cut a hole or square where the ribbon can be inserted.

Ribbon-border

Step 6: (Optional) To create a more finished-looking tag, we used some thin ribbon around the edges. If you’re working with thin ribbon, spray adhesive is best! Once all of the edges are covered with ribbon, snip the ends.

Ribbon-Finished

And you’re finished! Now it’s time to roll those clothes, tuck them in your bag and get ready for your trip.

Door-Final

Overhead-Final

Pool

1/3
We love this deep pool blue fabric from Waverly Inspirations with this vintage suitcase from Etsy.
2/3
This Waverly Inspirations orange and mint striped fabric reminds us of the awnings on patios. A DIY luggage tag would look amazing on this orange vintage luggage set.
3/3
For the jet-setter, this sunny yellow Waverly print + matching grosgrain scalloped ribbon would look snazzy with this yellow carry-on. The bright red crinoline pom pom breaks up the yellow factor.

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Comments

  • Thank you for the insightful safe mode of travelling information and super cute luggage tag DIY, but one thing that bothers me big time is that you suggest to have blast a full on hot shower just for un-wrinkling the clothes, with all the environmental problems and recent drought in LA, Venezuela, and many other place, I think we should be more aware of the water issues.
    Why not hang the clothes in the bathroom while showering?

    • Hi Agnes

      That’s a great point. Thanks for calling that to my attention. I live in the country, and while I try my best to care for the environment responsibly, having nature all around me sometimes makes me lose sight of issues like water conservation. I’ll keep this top of mind when traveling myself! And I’m going to edit the post to reflect this.

      Caitlin

  • Pack an empty spray bottle to fill with water and spritz your hanging clothes then smooth out wrinkles and let dry.

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