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Geometric Patterns Perk Up a Mid-Century Home in Oregon

by Garrett Fleming

I have always had a soft spot for intricate, bold patterns. The more offbeat the color combination and the wackier the style, the better. Lately, though, I’ve found myself in the minority as art directors, fashion designers and interior decorators alike continue to scale back on the bigness and detail of the patterns they use. These forward thinkers seem to be favoring more streamlined looks based in simple squares, rectangles, and what I call “squiggles.” Their more basic designs not only stand out when compared to overly-saturated looks, but they creep up and surprise you with how impactful – yet simple – they are.

The stunning paint jobs in the Portland, OR home of Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.’s Marketing Project Manager Summer Wick and her husband Brandon are a perfect example of how simple shapes can leave a lasting impression. Their bedrooms’ walls are decked out in basic triangles, and bold-and-black stripes add drama to the dining nook. The crisp shapes they’ve used in the patterns look easy enough to create. But as with most fundamental designs, there was more to it than meets the eye. It was a tedious, tiring and careful process. Using a stencil and a steady brush, the couple carefully spaced out each element and hand-painted every single one themselves.

These pretty wall treatments truly are the house’s pièce de résistance, but look past them and you’ll find a mid-century modern fan’s dream home. It didn’t land in Summer and Brandon’s lap this way, though. Left untouched for 60 years, the home had avocado walls, shag carpeting and pink tile when they moved in. Swapping out all of these outdated quirks may seem daunting to some, but not for this DIY pair. Huge fans of modern design themselves, the couple saw this as an opportunity to fully express their affinity for the era. Each tweak they’ve made to the space, from new appliances to lighting, has been carefully considered in order to fit seamlessly with the home’s original details. Click through to see just how Summer and Brandon have merged today and yesterday into one cohesive, memorable and gorgeous home. Enjoy! —Garrett

Photography courtesy of Jack Wineinger & Summer Wick

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Brandon meticulously hand painted these stripes to draw visitors' eyes to the charming dining nook. The bold choice is a far cry from the avocado walls that previously dominated the house. Paired with an IKEA cabinet, which he and Summer spray painted, the nook has become the home's can't-miss spot. Artwork and accessories from Goodwill further spice up the fabulous walls and cabinet.
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Without a doubt, Summer's role as Project Manager for Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. has heavily influenced her home's mid-century vibe. Multiple pieces from the brand deck her walls. Her husband Brandon, an Integrated Marketing man, and four-year-old daughter Amelia pose with Summer in the family's favorite spot: the living room.
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Balancing new and original elements was paramount when the couple renovated their ranch-style space. To match the home's original electric stove, which amazingly still works, the Wicks installed vintage-inspired pieces from GE's Artistry Series.
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Although it was meticulous and time-consuming, the Wicks are loving how their fantastic wall stenciling came out. The accompanying bedding is by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co., and Target.
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This up-cycled vintage side table holds a storage box Brandon's grandfather passed down to him.
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All it took to modernize their basement's style was a quick coat of white paint and adding new legs to the old IKEA sofa. While she loves how the touches have transformed the room, Summer's in a bit of a pickle when it comes to the original tile. "Many people who visit our home absolutely love the flooring, but it’s not really my aesthetic. I want to lighten it up a bit and create a fun, family atmosphere," she explains.
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"Our basement bar is pretty much what sold my husband on our house! From what we can tell, the bar was original to the home and we have not changed a thing... yet!" Summer shares. Not surprisingly, this feature makes the basement a popular spot when family and friends are kicking back.
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The previous owners left this steel desk behind when they moved out. Probably because it weighs 200 pounds! It's not uncommon to find Brandon hunkered down here working away.
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The bathroom had gone untouched for over 30 years before Summer and Brandon gave it a facelift. The pair replaced its pink, floral wallpaper and pink tile with this rustic – yet modern – look for only $500. It's amazing what some raw wood and Benjamin Moore "Hale Navy" paint can do. Not all of the bathroom was ripped out, though. The wall sconces from 1962 and original medicine cabinet were kept intact. They are too fabulous to toss.
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The couple knew the guest room would play host to people from all walks of life and with varying tastes, but that didn't mean Brandon and Summer could let its look become watered down and too neutral. To inject some personality into the space, the pair painted this stunning, geometric pattern on its ceiling. Bedding and furniture from IKEA and Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. decorate the room.
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"One of the best things about this room is the sunlight that comes through (the Urban Outfitters curtains). It feels so bright and welcoming," Summer tells us. To save some cash, and give the guest room's floor a custom feel, Brandon and Summer used leftover paint from the bathroom renovation to cover the damaged original wood floors. Lighting by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.
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The living room is the first thing one sees when they open the Wick family's front door. Keeping this in mind, the family designed it to drive home their aesthetic, decking it out in an "eclectic mix of old and new." The IKEA sofa and 70s lounge chair are the perfect example of this intermingling.
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Throughout the home, house plants are used to cover up cords and other eyesores. Like the majority of the home's artwork, this ship painting is from Goodwill. It lives above an Overstock side chair and throw pillow from Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.
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Amelia's "colorful and fun" personality was the inspiration for her room's look. "Amelia’s taste changes as she grows, and we want her room to be flexible to grow with those changes," Summer and Brandon say. Her vintage bed frame was a gift from family friends, and the quirky bunny print is by egg press. The bedding is by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. and the checked curtain is made out of fabric from IKEA.
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The three-bedroom home was built in 1954 and has two baths and a finished basement. As is with most ranch-style homes, the living areas are separate from the bedrooms.

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