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14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams

by Lauren Chorpening

In college, my introductory interior design courses were based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. This concept was fascinating to me, and it has changed how I view almost every space I enter. The hierarchy spells out what humans generally need from the basics of food, water, shelter along with safety, love and beauty. When engineers, architects and interior designers work, designing a proper shelter that meets physiological needs is the most important requirement. Then, the structure’s design accounts for safety, how it works relationally, and the aesthetics that will inspire the people who will live there.

Post-and-beam engineering has been around since the days of the pyramids. As it sounds, this process uses upright posts with horizontal beams to support ceilings and walls. These beams can be wood, concrete, metal or composite. It’s a structural technique used often in modern (and ancient) architecture. Coincidentally, it also brings a beautiful, impactful aesthetic to a space when left exposed — or uncovered later.

Here at D*S, we love that exposed beams remind us that our homes are secure, strong and safe, while also adding to the overall aesthetic. These 14 spaces featured on Design*Sponge over the years show how the same building element can impact designย in various styles, forms and rooms. โ€“Lauren

14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
1/14
Solid wood beams add charming character to this modern, industrial space.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
2/14
The white-washed beams in this Catskill home help combine the Scandinavian-modern interior with the rugged mountains outside.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
3/14
The beams in this converted attic bring rustic charm to a minimalistic design.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
4/14
Jason Leonard's Portland office renovation included opening up the ceiling to reveal beautiful, solid wood beams throughout the space.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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The living room beams in this San Clemente renovation are purely cosmetic, but they add drama and weight to this airy space.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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This Barcelona home is filled with combinations of styles, materials and furniture. The distressed beams mixed with modern beams fit perfectly in this space.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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White-on-white walls and beams add to this London loft's open, bright design.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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Luke's Melbourne, Australia home has pitched ceilings and support beams. The modern, white beams add charm to this country escape.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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Meghan and David were looking for a house with low ceilings so that they could vault them. The beams in this home bring warmth and character to the space.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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The gorgeous metal beams, large windows and wood floors give this photographer's shooting room a perfect industrial feel.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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The original beams in this 1850s home used to be the support for the small sleeping quarters once housed there. Now they are an elegant statement in this contemporary dining room.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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The pitched wood ceiling and beams were what sold Tienlyn and Nikko on this home. The couple's renovation of the space has been influenced by the beams. They have designed the space with an eclectic and textural feel.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
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Frances Palmer's ceramics studio is raw and serene with exposed posts and beams.
14 Dynamic Rooms with Exposed Beams | Design*Sponge
14/14
While renovating their Eichler mid-century modern home, Carolyn and Joseph wanted to keep the materials true to the original. The exposed redwood ceiling is set off and showcased even more by the white beams running through the entire home.

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