Comfort Zone

Comfort Zone: Lidy Dipert

by Sabrina Smelko


After being scared off from pursuing her true passion, Canadian-born Lidy Dipert attended school to become a teacher. But once she married her husband Joel, who lived in California at the time, Lidy saw her relocation as an opportunity to start fresh and give her love for interiors and blogging a chance. It was a vulnerable time for Lidy as she poured her heart into blogging — in a new place outside of her comfort zone — but she asserts it’s these risks and times of discomfort that shape us and build character.

The couple has since moved to Calgary, Alberta and they’ve welcomed three beautiful children into their lives through foster-adoptions and home (namely their living room) is finally a place that celebrates these changes. More than just a spot to decompress and relax in, their living space signifies some important milestones as a couple and family; from being a room that represents Lidy’s passion-turned-career, to the adoption of their foster children, to a housing spot for many of the couple’s handmade DIY projects (such a the brass swing lamp, modular shelving, and wood stump side table).

For Lidy, life still presents unexpected ups and downs, but having a permanent place to call home is something she doesn’t take for granted. Although she’s taken a break from blogging to raise their children, she’s joining us today to chat about her fears, what the process of fostering-to-adopt was like, and what she does when she feels overwhelmed and defeated. –Sabrina

Portrait Photography by Christine Choi

Tell us about yourself.

I am a Canadian-born design blogger and stay-at-home-mom. Very early on, as far as I can remember, I wanted to be an interior designer. When I was in high school, I was strongly advised to not pursue this career, as there was no guarantee I would ever make a living from it. Which terrified me, so I went to college to become a teacher because it was safe. But, as expected, I lost interest and found it hard to stay passionate about what I was working so hard to complete.

Luckily, I got married in the middle of my degree and moved to California where I found out I could not fully transfer my credits to the US. There, I decided it was time to take a chance and try something entirely new. I took graphic design and photography for two years and decided to start a blog on the side. At first, it wasn’t anything specific or even special, really. I wrote about what inspired me on the Internet, something I found at a thrift store, or a silly craft. But about a year or two into it, I rediscovered my love and passion for design, and the rest is history.

Full Shot One

What does home and this space mean to you? Describe it.

Our living room is the heart of the home. It’s where all the important conversations take place, where I go to decompress, to find inspiration, to find solace. It’s made up of a lot of special pieces, too. My husband is a talented man, so a lot of his handiwork is displayed in this space — like our brass swing lamp, modular shelving and wood stump side table. We also have our lovely Modernica rocker, which my husband and I gifted to one another for our anniversary present one year. We got it after we got placement of our three beautiful foster-children at the time (now adopted). So, it really marks an important date in time for us as well.

Detail One

What makes it so comfortable?

I think it’s easy to make any room feel comfortable with how you design the space. We opted for a modern Moroccan shag rug to break up the parquet (which [is] throughout our entire house) and to also help the room remain bright. It’s soft, fluffy and comfy. We also have a lot of pillows, throws and sheepskin, which make it easy to snuggle up whenever you take a seat anywhere. But regardless of all the the material things that make this room appear comfortable, I think it’s important how you live in it as well. We don’t really allow the kids to run around and play in this part of the house. It’s really used for relaxing and taking a load off. We have a family room downstairs if we want to watch movies, play games and whatnot.

Full Shot Two

What makes you uncomfortable? What is your biggest fear?

I feel the most uncomfortable when I am far from family and close friends. If I had to go somewhere far from home on my own and everything was really unfamiliar to me, I might freak out a bit. I wish I was more adventurous, though! But I think a lot of that has to do with how I want to share experiences with my loved ones and not just for myself. And I do make my own special memories away from my husband and kids, but I would rather have them to share it with.

Have you ever thrown caution to the wind and departed from your comfort zone? What happened as a result?

The only time I’ve ever really [taken] a risk with so many unknown variables and outcomes was when my husband and I decided we wanted to foster-to-adopt. There were so many uncertainties and forces working against us, but we knew that the risk was worth the fight and we persevered until the bitter end. Those kinds of experiences are worth it — every time. And I would do it again in a heartbeat. I think when you tune out all the negativity and fear that can saturate your thoughts and convictions, nothing but amazing things will come of it. I look at our three beautiful kids and I cannot imagine my life without them.

What have you learned as an adult that you wish you knew when you were younger?

As an adult, you are more rational with how you think and act. When you’re young, not only are you biologically incapable of seeing the bigger picture, but you have no real life experience to base your thoughts and actions on. I’ve learned that no matter the choices I make, I’m being molded and sculpted into a better version of who I once was. And each time, you become stronger and more capable of doing the right thing and [making the] overall best decision next time.

Detail Two

How do you unplug, recharge and unwind?

I love to just cozy-up on the couch and watch Netflix with my husband after the kids are tucked in bed. We end up eating our feelings after a stressful day of work and parenting, but I feel energized afterward — or maybe it’s just all the sugar.

We also unwind by escaping the daily grind and [taking] our kids on little adventures in the city. We catch the train at the zoo and head downtown where we walk the cute shops, grab some treats and make memories as a family. Times like that recharge my heart until it’s bursting.

Detail Three

Have you ever experienced burnout? How do you get back on your feet and stay inspired?

Burnouts seems like a monthly occurrence around here. Being a blogger is really hard work. It’s hard to think of original content day in and day out. Planning and scheduling posts. Creating and documenting projects for my blog and writing for other blogs as well. Plus, I don’t have the luxury of working at a studio away from home, so I am mothering at the same time. So, naturally, things pile up and get neglected.

When I start to feel overwhelmed and defeated, I just get real with myself: I can’t do it all; I’m not meant to. So I take some me time — whether [it’s] taking a hot bath, walking around my favorite store to window-shop, grabbing coffee with a friend. It’s just important to take yourself out of the stressful environment and just breathe. And I do a lot of soul-searching in those quiet times. Stop seeing only my world in my little bubble and start seeing the raw and real issues around me. It’s incredibly humbling to compare my issues to the issues of others who are suffering much, much worse.

What do you think the world could use less of, and more of?

Less brokenness and more redemption.

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    • Hey Nicole, you are correct m’dear! We’ve since learned that Lidy decided to take a break from blogging so she can focus more energy on raising their children, although you can still enjoy her archives.

  • I loved this piece. It was nice to read about Lidy’s perspective, reflections, fears and her family’s pursuit of adoption. I just celebrated my 40th adoption birthday by thanking my mom, eating pie, and buying more wallpaper!
    I recently saw a blog post called, “The Universal Family”– meant to highlight all the different ways families come together from across the globe. It occurred to me that maybe someone (at Design*Sponge or elsewhere) should create a series of photographs that specifically celebrates adoption! I’m sure you could find lots of readers who are interested in contributing their stories and photos!

    • hi batya!

      we did a series with will from bright bazaar (which you can still access on instagram at #wearefamily2014) that was started with the same mission- to share beautiful family photos that celebrated all types of families, including great stories of fostering, adoption, LGBT families, etc :)


  • Nice story of re-finding/returning to your interests & passion/s! I’ve been a foster parent for 4+ years now and fingers crossed on adoption w/the amazing little girl who has been w/us for 2 years. Fostering/adoption can be a challenging road, but so worth it if you have an open heart & home!

  • hmmm, I was checking out Libby’s blog, because I loved her style, but seems like she isn’t blogging anymore? Odd that she calls herself a blogger here. Is this an older article?

  • I also followed Lidy’s blog, love her style, and think it is important to note why she is taking a break. If you read her last blog post, it is a beautiful and touching testimony about how she is focusing less on herself and the physical stuff of this world and more on her relationship with and serving God. Raising children is a very big, amazing, exhausting, and admirable job but she does not mention this as her reason for taking a break, so its odd that you list this several times.

    • Joy

      We did not include any text or interpretation of Joy’s break that was not given to us directly, in her own words. So we haven’t listed/mentioned anything that she did not provide for us. She may speak in more detail on her own feeds/sites about her choices than she’s chosen to share here.


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