SEEKING & ACCEPTING HELP FROM OTHERS

Seeking & Accepting Help From Others
As creative, hands-on people, there’s an incredible amount of pressure to do things ourselves. That mindset may be what got you to where you are: accomplishing goals you set for yourself, turning a passion into a job, or building your dream home bit by bit. As a result, you now feel invincible. You might have even made yourself a needlepoint or woodblock print that says “I can do anything.” But can you, reeeeaaaaally?

There are a lot of things that we need. We need websites! We need to give our employees health insurance! We need a 60-second video pitch for Shark Tank! It’s not easy, but it’s time to learn how to seek and accept help. You’re the best at your thing, and you rely on clients and customers to need you. Now it’s time to go need someone else. A paintbrush is a tool and so is an accountant. Use both to create beautiful work. –ADAMJK

Seeking & Accepting Help From Others
Identify Need
Try It Yourself
Be Objective
Give Up
Find Help
Communicate
Accept It
You Did It

 


 

Adam J. KurtzAdam J. Kurtz (better known as ADAMJK) is an artist and author of 1 Page at a Time: A Daily Creative Companion. His dark (but optimistic) humor comes to life in an offbeat line of gifts and small trinkets. Follow him at @ADAMJK or in real life (he lives in Brooklyn because of course he does).

 

 

 

  1. This is absolutely perfect! Accepting help is something I’ve been getting better and better at over the years, and the last few steps are things we’ve been working on communicating better to our own web design clients – this is truly yours, but trust us to do it in a way that’s going to be effective for you.

    It’s so hard for business owners to let go of control, but it’s essential to growth. Always hire people who are better at that task than you are, and you’ll go far. Thanks for putting this together in such an easy to understand way.

  2. Chantel says:

    This is very helpful. Thanks for sharing.

  3. Emily says:

    This is really great advice! I have to admit I don’t often ask for help, but this is a nice reminder. :)

  4. leenie2 says:

    “…who you can afford to hire or compensate fairly”

    needs to be on it’s own page. In bold.

    1. Adam says:

      oh you KNOW that was intentional. I would have shouted it on the paper if I could.

  5. ruth says:

    Adam does it again! Thanks for being an ongoing source of inspiration Adam!

  6. Great advice and beautifully done. I’m actually really good at accepting help, and this is pretty much how I do it!

  7. Susan says:

    One really great thing about going through these stages is that in the beginning, when you do try it yourself, you develop an appreciation for what the task involves.

    There are so many business owners who have no idea how their accounting works, or their website, etc…But, being familiar with what it takes to make those things work in your business is really important- it also is a great way to make sure you hire the people you really need and will benefit with. I like that instead of just handing it off immediately, this starts off with giving it a try, yourself.

  8. Such a timely post for me. I totally need to ask for help more and not be shy to do so!

  9. meghan says:

    I always love Adam’s pieces. Definitely need to learn to let go sometimes and not try to do everything myself!!

  10. Helen says:

    These thoughts are wonderfully put and very helpful to anyone who is beginning or continuing in business.

  11. Carly says:

    So relevant to my life right now! I’m applying to jobs on the opposite coast and have found that people are willing to help as long as you ask for it. I reached out to established professionals, openly asking for advice and guidance. I was never turned away from people who wanted to help. It was a breath of fresh air to see people genuinely eager to help. But none of this would have happened if I didn’t hind the help and communicate with them.

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