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Interiors

A Dance Between Objects in Los Angeles

by Annie Werbler

Just before the last new year, textile designer Brook Perdigon decided to fulfill the dream of creating her own fabric line, and slowly began building a collection. Starting Brook Perdigon Textiles has fueled her to connect with her local design and manufacturing community in ways she never anticipated. It has also led her on some exceptional adventures — this spring BPT provided the drapery for The Lark, a small boutique hotel in Bozeman, Montana, as well as a recent two-week trip to India learning how to block print and sourcing antique textiles. While she’s busy doing all of that, pup Mister Niko (a 10-year-old rescue dachshund, chihuahua, and Jack Russell mix who was found outside a shelter in East LA), is content to chill at home.

In 2003 when Brook first moved to LA, she started studying textile and surface design, and fell in love with the discipline — its process, history, and manufacturing methods alike. Since then, she has been working in residential interiors designing custom textiles and carpets, both independently and for Tai Ping Carpets. Her 600-square-foot Los Feliz place is the quintessential LA pad, with its 50s-style kitchen and bathroom, tons of windows to capture the vibrant Southern California light, and added antique light fixtures. From her apartment of six years, Brook has a clear view of the Griffith Park Observatory, and can easily walk to the video store. (“Yes, I still rent videos like its 1989!”)

To make a house a home, Brook believes that the objects in it must be a direct reflection of personal experiences, interests, and important relationships. “In a way, they should be a visual timeline of your life… and if you don’t have a ton of space, then you have to be pretty selective about which points on the timeline to display.” To Brook, developing her home felt like “a dance between objects that were meaningful because they were given to me by people who I care about — objects that hold memories — and objects that I chose.” Incorporating a home studio into the main living areas has been a challenge, as Brook does not enjoy seeing clutter accumulate. In response, she has become ultra-organized, maximizing all available storage and closet zones, like the designated half of the kitchen cabinetry that holds silkscreening and painting supplies, fabric swatches, and dyes. And when she’s working on something big, Brook rearranges her furniture for either entertaining or printing new work. Living and working in a small space has taught her both how to let go and how to cherish. —Annie

Photography by Jared Richard

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In the living room of textile designer Brook Perdigon's mid-century Los Angeles home, pup Mister Niko spends the day napping. Due to her self-reported book obsession, the bookshelf is the most organized part of the room. "I love it because it is deep enough to store two layers of books (one in front + one behind) and you can set things on the top surface that are accessible," Brook shares. Vintage furniture and an area rug by Tai Ping Carpets complete the scene.
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Brook in her home studio.
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"I am lucky to have an amazing community of artist friends," Brook reflects. The seascape painting by artist Kristin Beinner James hangs above the living room sofa nearby a red "Fly Painting" drawing by John Knuth. Throw pillows come from Brook's own Mountains of the Moon Collection with a blanket from her recent trip to India, where she bought so many textiles she had to check three bags to get them all home.
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Displayed above Mister Niko's nap spot are two drawings by local artist Dawson Weber. Brook's money tree is fabled to increase its owner's funds along with its own grown. "Let's just say I have never worked so hard to keep a plant alive in my life, and I'm not 100% sure the superstition is true," Brook jokes. And for Mister Niko's part, he "has become quite famous in the neighborhood for his walking (often while peeing) handstands."
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On the living room bookshelf rest palm lamps from Brook's grandparents' Floridian beach house in the 60s. She has "a thing" for pirate ships, and found this one at an antique store in Tampa. Beside it sits a photo of Brook, her mom, sister, niece, and nephew - affectionately called "The REDs" in reference to their natural hair color.
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The Marantz stereo system was "a steal of a deal" on eBay, while the record player was a gift from an old friend. The golden good luck cat arrived on Brook's doorstep one year on her birthday, having traveled all the way from a friend in Hong Kong to wish her good luck in the new year, one of the most favorite gifts she has ever received.
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A vintage ottoman from Hernandez Furniture, the first thing Brook had recovered with one of her own fabrics, in Betu: Clay + Rust.
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Brook's bedroom was kept relatively neutral, as working in textiles means she deals in vibrant color all day, so at night she wants her resting space to be without much visual stimulation. The artwork above the bed by Ellen Lesperance is the knit pattern for a sweater of her own design.
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On the bed, throw pillows from Brook's The Blues Collection add a contrast to warmly-colored details in the room, and the hamsa was a gift for protection.
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A vintage bedside table also functions as a miniature dresser, with a key lock on the top drawer that Brook loves using. The table lamp was scored at an estate sale for $20, with its shade in an interesting texture that was printed in a bronze gold and antiqued organically over time. The furry bear rug on the floor is Mister Niko's proper bed.
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Brook keeps her jewelry in boxes gifted by her grandparents from a trip they took to Russia in the 80s. She brought the miniature painting back from her own recent trip to India. A vase by Dana Bechert Ceramics is set beside a rotating stack of books, from which Brook often reads several at a time.
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Brook's great grandmother's trunk once came across the country on a covered wagon, and is now filled with blankets her mother has knit for her over the years. "I swear she is a textile artist in disguise!" she offers. Her own print is the original artwork for her KIVU design. The cowgirl hat from Brook's uncle was given to her on one of their family trips, and polka dot curtains were made by her best friend's mother from material sourced on fabric.com.
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The brown chest in a tiny hallway nook holds many types of things. "It is the most spatially organized situation I have ever created," Brook asserts. Antique mirrors fitted with vintage hand-tinted postcards hang above.
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Obsessed with all things black and white, Brook displays another Dana Bechert vase filled with her favorite marigolds and an analog camera, a gift from a friend. Brook and her boyfriend take this camera wherever they go, often letting months pass before having the film developed. "It is always so fun to be reminded of adventures of the recent past, and to see non-digital and tangible results," Brook reflects.
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The inspiration wall in Brook's home studio, where she tacks old paintings, strike-offs of her designs, color swatches, and anything that may eventually find its way into a collection. The rigorously-organized storage cart on wheels can be moved into the center of the room, fitted with a board on top, and easily turned into a work table.
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The layout of Brook's one-bedroom apartment with her artist's studio in Los Angeles.
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Fabric samples with custom ink colors and books for inspiration around the studio.
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"The thing I love about my home is that every object in it tells a story or is connected to a person, place, or experience that is important to me! Oh and this guy (Mister Niko)" - Brook Perdigon
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Both Brook and Mister Niko love the office area, but he utilizes its cozy nap spot opportunities. Brook's boyfriend built the desk for her of metal legs and a dark, walnut-stained desktop to suit the mood of her prints. Her own Ituri lampshade adds some movement to the space. "PLUS the window looks out onto the POOL, so I can spy on the neighbors as I work. Shhhh...." she jokes.
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Another miniature painting from India, and some painted color swatches from Brook's sketchbook.
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This "loot stack" contains just a sampling of the textiles Brook brought back from India, some of which are available for sale on her site.
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The small galley kitchen has hosted many meals cooked and shared with friends.
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A cozy dining area in the kitchen, where the original artwork for Brook's Betu design and a clothesline holding strike-offs to dry are on display. The Michael Jackson Dia de los Muertos figurine comes from Santa Fe.
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Most of Brook's serving bowls, cookware, and kitchen accoutrements were gifts from her Southern mother. "She has exceptional taste and knows what it takes to throw a good party," Brook adds.
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Brook recently gave her grandparents' chair new life with the Kivu print, which she loves almost as much as Niko does. The "Niko" plate on the wall was a gift from Brook's best friend's mother, ceramicist Meg Courtney.
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Detail of the chair after Mister Niko's nap hour, and more books to be read.
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A favorite childhood picture of Brook, her sister, and grandpa.

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