Quantcast

Food & Drinkrecipes

Grandbaby Cakes’ Cinnamon Roll Poundcake

by Grace Bonney

grandbabycakes
In the breakfast food hierarchy, few things rank as highly for me as a cinnamon roll. Add a little icing and I’m in heaven. But turn it into a poundcake and you’ve got a real winner.

This recipe for Cinnamon Roll Poundcake is from Jocelyn Delk Adams‘ new cookbook, Grandbaby Cakes and it’s one of many recipes that captures the feeling of being comforted and loved by home cooking perfectly. This recipe reminds me of mornings spent in my grandmother’s kitchen and it turns out that Jocelyn’s grandmother was the inspiration for this poundcake- and the origin so many of her family’s amazing recipes. I love the modern spin Jocelyn puts on her family’s recipe and especially on these classic cinnamon buns. I can’t wait to try them. xo, grace

You can check out Jocelyns’ book here and here, read her interview on DS here and read on for the full recipe after the jump.

Grandbaby-Cakes-Cover-500x667

Cinnamon Roll Pound Cake
SERVES 12–16

(Reprinted with permission from Grandbaby Cakes by Jocelyn Delk Adams, Agate Surrey, 2015)

When I was 28 years old, I made my first batch of homemade cinnamon rolls. Better late than never! Before that moment, I loved watching Big Mama make all her yeasty, high-rising rolls without attempting to make them myself. Instead, I ate store-bought honey buns whenever I craved them.

This cake is a tribute to good ol’-fashioned gooey rolls, soft and full like fluffy pillows, piping hot out of the oven, entwined with ribbons of spiced cinnamon sugar, sticky with dripping cream cheese icing—the kind that make you want to slap yo’ mama. Don’t worry, I don’t mean that phrase literally! No one should ever slap his or her mama. I mean that as the ultimate expression of praise and honor of food. If ever one could capture the magic and decadence of cinnamon rolls in a cake, without the intimidating yeast, I think I have. Imagine a moist pound cake with a buttery cinnamon swirl dancing through the batter like a ballerina. Then, top that with the notorious cream cheese icing cinnamon rolls are known for. Bake this and get ready to slap someone.

CAKE
1½ cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
2½ cups granulated sugar
6 large eggs, room temperature
3 cups sifted cake flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
1 cup sour cream, room temperature
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon vanilla extract

CINNAMON SWIRL
⅓ cup (5 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon) unsalted butter, melted
⅔ cup packed light brown sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

ICING
2 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
1½ cups confectioners’ sugar
¼ cup milk (can be whole, 2%, or even refrigerated coconut)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

FOR THE CAKE
Preheat your oven to 325°F. Liberally prepare a 12-cup Bundt pan with the nonstick method of your choice.

In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the butter for 1 minute on high speed. Slowly add the granulated sugar. Cream together for an additional 5 minutes, until very pale yellow and fluffy. Add the eggs 1 at a time, combining well after each addition and scraping down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed.

Turn your mixer down to its lowest speed and slowly add the flour in 2 batches. Add the salt and baking soda. Be careful not to overbeat. Add the sour cream, oil, and vanilla extract. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl and mix the batter until just combined. Be careful not to overmix. Set the batter aside.

FOR THE CINNAMON SWIRL
In a small bowl, whisk together all the ingredients until well combined. Set aside.

TO BAKE
Pour ⅓ of the batter into the prepared pan.

Drizzle ½ of the cinnamon swirl over the batter. Using a butter knife or skewer, swivel the mixture through the cake batter, creating a flourish pattern.

Repeat with the rest of the cake batter and cinnamon swirl. Top with the remaining batter.
Bake for 75 to 85 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out mostly clean.

Let the cake cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes, then invert onto a serving plate. Let cool to room temperature. Lightly cover the cake with foil or plastic wrap so it does not dry out.

FOR THE ICING
Clean your stand mixer bowl and whisk attachment. Beat the cream cheese and butter for 2 minutes on medium-high speed.

Reduce your mixer speed and carefully add the confectioners’ sugar in 2 batches, scraping down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed. Once the sugar is fully incorporated, turn your mixer back up to medium-high speed. Add the milk and vanilla extract and beat until the icing is smooth and pourable.

Drizzle the icing over the cooled pound cake. Serve at room temperature.

Suggested For You

Comments

  • oh that sounds amazing. I’ve made cinnamon rolls before and they are practically cake so why not just embrace it and make it all cake!!

  • Do you use sour heavy whipping cream or is this recipe take sour cream out of a tub (like you use on baked potatoes)?
    Thanks

  • Oh, man! Cinnamon rolls and pound cake in one? I am definitely saving this recipe for when I hit my goal weight. If I made it now, the scale would go in the wrong direction, because I’d eat the whole entire thing by myself :)

  • Had to come back to report that THIS thing of beauty could wipe out our need for U.N. Peacekeepers, for SURELY this Cinnamon Roll Pound Cake shall bring peace to the land! I didn’t realize until I started baking that the only pan I had was an angel food cake pan. Be Warned: The cake cooks faster in this pan – about 60 minutes at the recommended 325. And, the cinnamon swirl goodness is likely to turn into a caramel on the bottom of the pan, so pop the cake out quick-fast, before the delicious sugar crust hardens and takes the rest of the cake hostage, forcing you to eat it all by yourself, from the bottom up, with a spoon, after everyone else in the house has gone to bed….wait, I digress. Surely what I meant was: The standard bundt pan is preferable for ease of baking (and portion control). Thanks!

    • Suga Puddin’

      I’m sorry you had that happen- that’s why Jocelyn specified the Bundt pan in the recipe :(

      If you ever run into any issues where you don’t have the pan/ingredients listed in a recipe, please just drop us a comment or email and we can reach out to the recipe writer to ask about subsitutions. Don’t want anyone to waste ingredients :)

      Grace

      • Awww! That’s so sweet. Thank you! The cake is DELICIOUS, and the whole thing will probably be eaten by morning. Thanks for the introduction. I can’t wait for my cookbook to arrive. Take care!

Leave a Reply

Design*Sponge reserves the right to restrict comments that do not contribute constructively to the conversation at hand, contain profanity, personal attacks, hate speech or seek to promote a personal or unrelated business. Our goal is to create a safe space where everyone (commenters, subjects of posts and moderators) feels comfortable to speak. Please treat others the way you would like to be treated and be willing to take responsibility for the impact your words may have on others. Disagreement, differences of opinion and heated discussion are welcome, but comments that do not seek to have a mature and constructive dialogue will not be published. We moderate all comments with great care and do not delete any lightly. Please note that our team (writers, moderators and guests) deserve the same right to speak and respond as you do, and your comments may be responded to or disagreed with. These guidelines help us maintain a safe space and work toward our goal of connecting with and learning from each other.