Yossy Arefi’s Fruit Pie

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Many times, the recipes you see on the In the Kitchen With column are the result of years of patient pursuit (and vigilant spam filters). I begin to admire photographer, baker, and author, Yossy Arefi’s photography a few years ago and reached out to her immediately through her blog, Apt 2b Baking Co. After several unsuccessful attempts, we were finally able to get in touch via Instagram this year. This week’s Apricot and Raspberry Pie is the result! I agree with Yossy that summer is the best time for pies because of the wonderful selection of fruits available. I am also always in pursuit of the next best crust. Try this out and let us know what you think! –Kristina

Why Yossy loves this recipe: Summer is my very favorite season to be a baker, which I know sounds a little backwards, but it’s because I love making fruit pies. My favorite pies strike a balance between sweet and tart, so I often combine an extra-sweet fruit like apricots with a fruit more on the tart side in this case, raspberries. The pairing also provides a nice mix of textures within the pie; the apricots are luscious and soft and the raspberries provide little bursts of crunchy seeds, which I love. The small amount of almond extract in this pie is a subtle flavor note that complements both fruits, but if you are allergic to nuts or don’t care for almond extract, feel free to omit it.

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Photography by Yossy Arefi, portrait by Christine Han

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Apricot and Raspberry Pie

Makes one 9-inch pie

Crust

– 2 2/3 cups all purpose flour

– 1 teaspoon salt

– 18 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes

– 6-8 tablespoons ice cold water

– 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

– 1 egg, lightly beaten for egg wash

– turbinado sugar, to finish

To make the crust, combine the flour and salt in a bowl. Use your fingers or a pastry cutter to cut in half of the butter until it is the size of peas, then cut in the other half until it is the size lima beans. Some of the butter will be completely worked into the flour, but you should have lots of visible pieces of butter in the dough too. Add the apple cider vinegar to the water and make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Use a gentle hand or wooden spoon to mix about 6 tablespoons of the water into the flour until just combined. If the dough seems very dry, add more water a couple of teaspoons at a time. You have added enough water when you can pick up a handful of the dough and squeeze it together easily without it falling apart. Press the dough together, then split it in half, form into discs and wrap each half in plastic wrap. Chill the dough for at least one hour before using, or overnight. I prefer an overnight rest if at all possible

 

Filling

– 1 1/2 pounds fresh apricots, firm but ripe

– 8 ounces raspberries

– 3/4 cup granulated sugar

– 3-4 tablespoons cornstarch

– zest and juice of 1/2 of a lemon

– 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped and pod reserved for another use

– 1/4 teaspoon almond extract (optional)

– pinch salt

 

To Assemble and Bake

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 425ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out one piece of the dough into a 12-inch circle about 1/8-inch thick and place it into a 9-inch pie pan. Refrigerate while you prepare the rest of the pie. Roll out the other piece of dough into a 12-inch circle about 1/8-inch thick and place it in the fridge on a sheet pan to chill while you prepare the filling.

In a large bowl, rub the vanilla bean seeds and lemon zest into the sugar with your fingertips to evenly distribute, add 3 tablespoons of the cornstarch and stir to combine well.

Use your hands to tear the apricots in half and discard the pits, they should easily come apart. Add the apricot halves to the bowl with the sugar mixture, and stir gently to combine. Add the raspberries, lemon juice, and almond extract. Stir gently until just combined. Be careful not to crush the raspberries too much. If there seems to be a lot of excess juice in the bowl from the fruit, add the remaining tablespoons of cornstarch and stir gently to combine (when making the pie pictured, I used all 4 tablespoons).

Fill the prepared pie shell with the filling and top with the second crust, crimp the edges and cut a few vents in the top. Alternately, you can top the pie with a woven lattice crust (see a tutorial here).

Trim the edges of the dough evenly, then fold the bottom dough up and over the lattice strips. Crimp the edges of the dough together to seal.

Slide the whole pie into the fridge or freezer for about 15 minutes or until the crust is very firm before baking. When you are ready to bake the pie, brush the crust with the beaten egg and sprinkle with a healthy dose of coarse sugar.

Put the pie on the prepared baking sheet to catch any drips and bake for 15 minutes then lower the oven temp to 400ºF and bake for 35-45 more minutes or until the crust is deep golden brown and the juices bubble. Cool before serving with ice cream or whipped cream.

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About Yossy: Yossy Arefi is a Brooklyn-based photographer, baker, and writer. Originally from Seattle, she moved to New York in 2007 to pursue her passion for cooking. She spent several years baking in a busy Manhattan restaurant, and in 2012, she left the restaurant business to focus on photography and writing full­ time. Regardless of the season, you’re likely to find her navigating the stalls of New York’s many Greenmarkets with her trusted Pentax K1000 close at hand. Yossy’s forthcoming cookbook will be published by Ten Speed Press in early 2016. Yossy can also be found at Twitter and Instagram.

Yossy Arefi for PC_Christine Han Photography-82

  1. Neha Sharma says:

    It’s looks so Yummy…!!! Love it.

  2. Dolapo O says:

    Yum! Will have to try out the recipe. Great pictures too!

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