Interiorssneak peeks

A Beauty Stylist’s 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris

by Garrett Fleming

Listening to the Seine’s seagulls from your living room, looking out over 12th-century landmarks, and awash in light all day, Lucille’s Parisian home is nothing short of fantastical. Built in 1650 and fully renovated by her and her husband, the 5-room-2-floor home offers a calming retreat for the beauty editor, her husband Charles and their two little ones. When the family was on the hunt for a new home 3 years ago, they never fathomed they could snag a spot in the popular and historic Le Marais neighborhood. With a resurgent art scene and a focus on fashion, the oldest neighborhood in Paris has the caché that so many Europeans want a piece of. After visiting over 70 homes, the couple took a risk and toured what was the “old, dirty, and very different,” apartment that they have flipped into their new home. The space’s light, unique layout and atypical design had the couple hooked from the get go.

Once the papers were signed and the movers were ready, Lucille and Charles only had 2 months to make their new home livable. It didn’t help that all the renovations were coming to light in August – a time when most Parisians close up shop for holiday. Luckily, the two were able to find the help they needed to achieve the “simple, authentic and cozy,” look they had always dreamed of. New flooring throughout and new paint for all of the walls – but only after knocking some down – have given this 300-year-old home new life. They aren’t done yet; however, as a brand-spanking-new master bath is on the horizon. If the rest of their home is any indication of what that’ll look like, I am positive the results will be stunning. I think you’ll agree that their painstakingly-planned renovation could not have come together in a more beautiful manner. Enjoy! —Garrett

Photography by Lucille Gauthier-Braud 

 

A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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Thanks to large windows, the living room basks in sunlight all day. Working in cosmetics has Lucille surrounded by vibrant hues all day. She finds it so soothing to come home to the clean, neutral color palette she's established in her home. The coffee table is vintage and the armchairs are from Gervasoni and Honoré Marseille.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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Lucille calls her living-room shelving her "magic walls," because as her mood changes, so does its accessories. Théophile and Domitille have a lot of toys, so storage bins that blend in throughout the home were a necessity.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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Bringing elements from the outdoors in is important to this French family. It always provides just the right amount of zen they all need after a busy day.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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This comfortable corner of the living room epitomizes Lucille's view on accessorizing. She loves the look of items that "have lived. It gives soul to the decoration(s)," she says.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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"I don't like pictures of me. Hiding behind the camera is where I feel better," Lucille says. Opening her blog LgB gave her a renewed interest in photography.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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The kitchen was originally divided into two, dark rooms. The couple took down the walls and installed all new IKEA furniture. In order to give the illusion of more space, the cabinetry was all kept low to the ground.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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"To bring greenery inside the house, I buy branches and flowers from the Marché des Enfants Rouges, which is just around the corner." The metal cabinetry from Tsé Tsé adds an industrial touch to the overall vintage look of the kitchen.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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Lucille and Charles chose this IKEA wash bin for its "retro look." The washcloths are from Tensira.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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The couple created a linen closet with doors from Charle's parents' home.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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The couple stripped the beams in the kitchen themselves "to give it a rougher look." The buffet was found on a flea-market trip and the white lamp is from the 70s.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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The kitchen's dining area has all the appeal of the French countryside with "authentic and natural elements."
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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The glass ceiling was already installed when the family moved in, but some water leaks meant an upgrade was in order. "The metal parts of the glass roof were painted in black to (add) an industrial, graphic touch. The stairs and the old door were painted in greys from Farrow and Ball."
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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Cole and Son wallpaper in the master bedroom was installed by Lucille's father.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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The apartment is unconventional in that the living and kitchen areas are on the top floor while the bedrooms and front door are on the first. The bed is from AMPM.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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Sunlight touches nearly every part of this family's home thanks to their renovation.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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A cozy corner in the master bedroom perfect for unwinding.
A Beauty Stylist's 300-Year-Old Maison in Paris, Design*Sponge
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"The thing I love most about my home is to play with my shelf to create new atmospheres."

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