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NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print

by Annie Werbler

The fortnight of events comprising NYCxDESIGN (formerly known as New York Design Week to any old-school attendees in the house) has finally come to a close, marking a particularly robust annual showing at the citywide festival of events revolving around all things design. Our collective cultural consciousness sometimes inspires artists and makers with similar concepts iterated in vastly different ways. Our first trend pick of the season is the inky, hand-drawn graffiti markings threaded throughout many shows this season. While brush script lettering has become popular over the past few years, the bold, angular movements of these latest stroke patterns and murals feel more like frenetic 1980s Keith Haring than homespun calligraphy. Whether the trend is a reaction to all the stark, neat geometry that’s synonymous with Brooklyn design exports right now, or instead is sparked by the popularity of kuba cloth textiles for their organic yet graphic vibes, contrasting hand-drawn graffiti print is having a moment. Feel free to share your favorites in the comments! โ€”Annie

NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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London artist Shantell Martin worked on a black ink mural for B+N Industries on the company's System 1224 merchandising wall product throughout the duration of ICFF.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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Also at ICFF, the Shoal Shimmy wallcovering pattern in Sumi and Atlantis colorways by Astek Inc. give an abstracted impression of looking down at ocean ripples on a windy day.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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DUSEN DUSEN has been creating energetic squiggle patterns for quite a while, and the latest multicolored fills and stroked voids appear in a collaborative Sight Unseen OFFSITE with the work of furniture designer Eric Trine. Photo via Wilder.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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Another Sight Unseen OFFSITE collaboration, TUNICA applied organic brushstroke gestures on ceramic vessels created by SaintKaren. Photo via TUNICA.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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In an exhibition titled Inside Out, Polish Graphic Design within Wanted Design Manhattan, this gestural drawing called "The Lord did not stand here" is by illustrator Malwina Konopacka.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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Juju Papers did not disappoint at ICFF! We shared the latest patterns on the site last week, and this Big Moon design was even more stunning in person.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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This modern Tibetan style from Apadana Fine Rugs at ICFF would make an excellent alternative to the shaggy Beni Ourain carpets found just about everywhere these days.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Graffiti Print, on Design*Sponge
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This High Style Stone & Tile porcelain product called Fossil was a standout example of some softer, more organic tile looks at ICFF.

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