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NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting

by Annie Werbler

Makers throughout NYCxDESIGN toiled at the intersection between modern technology and traditional handicrafts. While the following finds are all artisan-made, the objects contain varying levels of discernible computer input. Some patchwork pieces suggest only a hint of digital intervention in their geometric motifs or chic textures, while others take tech further by employing programming to determine the very look of a final product. We feel inspired by these reconciliatory efforts, the designs that pay so much reverence to old ways while ingeniously incorporating tools available at the present moment. Feel free to share your favorite contemporary quilted pieces from the shows in the comments! —Annie

NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting, on Design*Sponge
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NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting, on Design*Sponge
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A handmade Meg Callahan patchwork quilt (beside a MAU • CALLAHAN bench collaboration with her boyfriend Andrew Mau of Sneak Peek fame) at Sight Unseen OFFSITE pairs muted colors with sharp geometry. Photo via Meg Callahan.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting, on Design*Sponge
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At Wanted Design Manhattan, textile designer Libs Elliott shows her handcrafted quilts featuring patterns fully generated by a computer algorithm.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting, on Design*Sponge
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Design software offers countless ways of configuring ICI Vintage Patchwork carpets, shown here at ICFF, by combining recycled pieces of worn antique rugs in customizable compositions.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting, on Design*Sponge
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The Thompson Street Studio booth at ICFF featured many standout pieces, including this quilt by Coulter Fussell from Water Valley, Mississippi as part of the Run Home Collection.
NYCxDESIGN 2015 Trends We Love: Contemporary Quilting, on Design*Sponge
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This delicate Thompson Street Studio tapestry combines warm tones with the occasional metallic sheen.

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Comments

  • Yay for modern quilting! It’s so wonderful to start seeing this beautiful craft getting some (well deserved) attention. I’m also a big Meg Callahan fan. Her work is stunning, and she always documents it in such an interesting way.

  • Thank you so much for including me in this post! It was exciting to be in NYC for Design Week and thrilling to know that I wasn’t the only quilter showing work. Surrounded by so much talent!