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before and after

Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home’s Full Facelift

by Garrett Fleming

Jess and Nathan, the founders of See By Design, took on quite the project when they decided to give this 1960s ranch-style home in Red Hook, NY a total facelift. Though it was quite the undertaking and took the couple a year to complete, the results speak for themselves. Futurism mixes with vintage touches to create a space that’s very “now.” I can’t say that I have seen a more forward-thinking bathroom outside of a showroom. While the entire makeover is a glowing success, it’s that particular room’s burning pink walls that I won’t soon forget. Enjoy! —Garrett

Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The two took the kitchen's original doors and used them for the bathroom's vanity. In order to make the ceiling appear higher, they eliminated all of the top cabinetry.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The cabinetry is from IKEA and the countertop is custom-made of Douglas fir. When the upper cabinetry was removed, it was clear that major repairs would have to be done to the wall, so these wood panels went up over the damaged areas. The pine, chevron floor covers the kitchen's original linoleum.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The rich color of the fridge and oven were specifically chosen so they'd appear to float in the kitchen's sea of white.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The kitchen was the darkest room in the home, so the divider (upper right) between the living room and kitchen was widened to bring in more light.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The updated living room.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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An old broom closet was re-imagined as a guest bath.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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Inspired by artist James Turrell, Nathan and Jess created the paint by mixing three different fluorescent colors from a local art supply store. The goal is simple: to surprise and jolt their unsuspecting guests.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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To compensate for the loss in storage, this large pantry was installed.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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These walls dividing the living and dining rooms were opened up in order to help the entire space flow more smoothly.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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What was originally some horse-fencing for their back deck eventually became the couple's dining table. Lighting by IKEA.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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A new paint job in high-gloss Rust-Oleum gave this old dresser a new life with Jess and Nathan. The abstract wall sculptures are actually deconstructed, antique picture frames that the two created themselves.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The bedroom required the least amount of work.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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That being said, a fresh paint job and new plaster make the space look entirely brand new.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The neighboring bedroom's closet made this guest bath feel cramped and uninviting, so it was removed entirely.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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The small window was added above the pocket door to allow more light into the otherwise shady bathroom. A double vanity replaced the neighboring bedroom's intruding closet.
Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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Before & After: A Hudson Valley Home's Full Facelift, Design*Sponge
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Here's where the kitchen's cabinet doors were put to use. Again, horse-fencing wood was used for the countertop. Jess and Nathan devised this giant mirror by using 12x12 mirror tiles surrounded by a custom-made frame. The toilet was moved and hidden.

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Comments

  • Are the floorboard radiator covers custom? Every rental and home for sale in New England has those and they are the worst.

    • Hi Lindsey
      The floors take a fair amount of planning to make sure the design lays out in a nice way. You start by either centering the pattern in the middle of the room-like we did- or centering in a main doorway. Our floor is Chevron which differs from Herringbone in that each end of the Chevron board is cut at a 45 degree angle. We love both styles but chose Chevron in the end.

  • Love this makeover. I especially like that pocket window idea above the bathroom door. We have a small bathroom in our house with no windows and our master bath has one tiny window, so that would be really great to utilize! Already told my husband we should think about it! :)

  • please,please,please a tutorial on the abstract picture frames and could you tell us the brand of florescent paints used in the bathroom. Gorgeous !!!(said in a very high pitched, excited voice)

    • Good morning Sunshine!
      The flourescent paint that we used is Flashe brand. Easy to find at most art supply shops. The picture frames are a lot of random angles and hours on the chop saw. If you’ve got the patience Im sure you could easily pull it off.

    • Hi Lulu
      The original floors were a mix of tired linoleom and dark Beech, so we covered over the linoleom with pine and painted them with bright white oil based Rustoleum.
      When painting a wood floor its important to prime it with shellac based white pigmented primer because it blocks the tanins in the wood from bleeding through and wrecking the finish coat.
      Even though it smells awful only use oil paint on floors. Acrylic will never create a cleanable hardwearing surface.

  • How well are the painted floors wearing?
    What precautions do you take with pets, boots, furniture legs?
    any regrets?
    gracias

    • Hi Fe
      Our floors are holding up well. We have 2 pets that really like to go crazy and we haven’t had any problem areas. We use furniture bumpers under the legs and have a mud room were we leave our boots which helps keep it clean.
      The most important thing is to sand and clean the floors before painting which is the only way to assure that its well bonded. A painted floor has the added bonus of being easy to redo with out hiring a floor refinisher.
      If your interested just remember to only clean the floor with denatured alcohol before painting because all other soaps will leave a residue that will not let the paint fully adhere. And only use shellac primer to block stains. Good luck.

    • Hi Fe,
      Our floors are holding up well. We have 2 crazy animals and so far it still looks great. We do use furniture bumpers to avoid scratches which you really should do with any floor. I would say the most important thing when painting a floor is the preparation.
      We sanded it first and then primed it with tinted shellac primer which stops stains from coming through the finish and then finished the floor with oil paint. Let everything dry for a few days.
      No regrets!
      best of luck.

  • The home is even more breathtaking when seen in person. The homemade bed, dining room table, and frames are so beautiful!

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