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Anatomy Lesson: Our favorite body part designs

by Maxwell Tielman

We interrupt your daily feed of Design*Sponge goodies to bring you this important message: Don’t panic, but the design world may or may not be in the middle of a zombie apocalypse. No, I’m not referring to the back-from-the-dead return of Postmodernism or the reclaimed wood trend that refuses to die (not that we would ever want it to!). My cause for concern is that all of the sudden, everybody seems to have a mad, hungry craving for BODIEESSS! From Isaac Nichols’ fabulously nip-tastic ceramics (NSFW?) and Ellen Porteus’ patterns of hands to straight-up gruesome limb-strewn prints by Faye Moorhouse, disembodied human body parts are all the rage these days. Not that we’re complaining. In all honesty, with designs this cute, consider us bitten. We’ve rounded up a few of our favorite new human body-themed designs — dig in! —Max

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Clockwise from top left: Poppy Lissiman's Evil Eye Clutch; Leif Shop's Hands Pillow; Universal Isaac's Dash Pot; Jonathan Adler's Brass Finger Coat Hook; Seb Brown's Hannibal Ring.
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Helen Levi's Gilded Hand Necklace.
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These pillow covers and wall hangings from Confetti Riot feature Picasso-like deconstructions of facial features—eyes, noses and lips!
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Illustrator Ellen Porteus' "Mani" print.
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This pink scarf from Suturno is covered in legs!
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Suturno's Manos scarf.
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Eyes and hands make appearances in the pattern that covers Stampel's iPad Clutch.
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Martina Thornhill's Nose Mug.
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Seletti x Toiletpaper's Fingers Plate and Eye Mug.
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Cold Picnic's rugs depict 'private' body parts in a subtle, graphic style.
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Ariele Alasko's beautiful, hand-carved Hand Salad Servers.
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Taryn St. Michele's Bombshell Kisses print.

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