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Food & Drinkrecipes

Kerrin Rousset’s Multigrain Chocolate Chip Cookies

by Kristina Gill

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When I think of chocolate, I think of Kerrin Rousset, the blogger behind MyKugelhopf and Sweet Zürich tours. Kerrin and I met over Twitter a few years ago and I had the immense pleasure of meeting her in person over a bowl of granola in New York. These two loves of hers are the inspiration behind her recipe today for Multigrain Chocolate Chip Cookies with Maldon Salt. I first found out about these cookies from an image she posted on her Instagram feed, and thought it would be a great recipe to share with our readers. Procuring the cracked rye, or rye grits, proved to be a bit of a challenge for me in Rome, where the whole grain is not terribly easy to find. However, you may make cracked rye by having your local health food store run a batch of whole rye through a grinder, to grind it into coarse bits, or use a coffee grinder. These little crunchy surprises are an essential feature of Kerrin’s cookie, which I absolutely love! –Kristina

Kerrin Rousset is a sweet-toothed New Yorker who has called Zürich home since 2008. Passionate about all things sweet and Swiss, especially chocolate, she founded Sweet Zürich tours (featured on CNN and in the Financial Times) to share her favorite top-quality artisans with locals and tourists. Leading small groups around the old town, Kerrin teaches all there is to know about chocolate, including its history in Switzerland. She helped bring Paris’ famous Salon du Chocolat to Switzerland and continues to travel the world, writing about her adventures and sweet discoveries on her blog, MyKugelhopf. Follow her on Instagram to see what she’s schlepping back from the market, what chocolate she’s tasting, glimpses of her two-year-old daughter, or chance encounters with Roger Federer while she’s out on her daily run around the lake.

See how to make Kerrin’s cookies after the jump!

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Kerrin’s multigrain chocolate chip cookies with maldon salt
Makes approximately 32 cookies

7 tablespoons (100 grams) butter, very soft, at room temperature
1 cup plus 3 1/4 teaspoons (125 grams) light brown sugar, packed
1/2 cup (100 grams) white granulated sugar
1/2 cup (65 grams) white flour
1/2 cup (65 grams) whole wheat flour
1/2 cup minus two teaspoons (60 grams) buckwheat flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/8 tsp kosher salt
1 large egg, at room temperature
1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
1/4 cup (40 grams) cracked rye
6 ounces (170 grams) dark chocolate (preferably 60-70% cacao solids)
Maldon salt

*Note one cup of flour is calculated as 4.6 ounces / 130 grams

Instructions:
Roughly chop the dark chocolate and set aside. Whisk the dry ingredients together in a medium bowl (flours, leavening agents and salt). Cream the butter and sugars for about 5 minutes (best to use standing mixer with paddle attachment). With mixer on medium, add egg and egg yolk, beat another 2-3 minutes.  With mixer on low, continually sprinkle in the dry ingredients, stop while you still see streaks of flour.  Add the cracked rye and beat until all dry ingredients are just incorporated (less than a minute). Use spatula to scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl. Add the chocolate and let the paddle spin a few times just to incorporate. Do not overmix. Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and refrigerate for one hour.

Preheat oven to 375 F / 190 C.

Using a #50 ice cream scoop, portion dough onto a single baking sheet lined with parchment paper.  Overfill the scoop with batter, and use the inside of the bowl to pack and level each round of dough. Drop onto sheet, leaving some space between each round of dough to allow for some spreading. (Do not flatten or touch). Sprinkle each one generously with Maldon salt. Make sure not to concentrate only on the very center of the cookie, as they will spread during baking. Bake for 8 to 9 minutes, or only as soon as the edges start to brown. The key is to take them out of the oven even if they are slightly underbaked, so that they do not spread too much. Gently remove from oven, as not to deflate the cookies. Let set on baking sheet for a couple of minutes before touching. Move to a cooling rack. Pour a tall glass of milk. Enjoy!

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Why Kerrin loves this recipe: My two favorite things to bake are chocolate chip cookies and granola. I’ve been baking the cookie recipe on the back of the Toll House chip bag since I was sitting on the kitchen counter as a kid, helping my mom mix. (It was her idea to steal chips!) And while nothing beats that for nostalgia, I love playing with just about everything in the recipe now – trying different flours, types of dark chocolate, adding fun ingredients (pretzels!) and sea salt. When I make granola, I always mix up tons of different grains and seeds (oat, millet, barley, flax…) and end up adding dark chocolate and sea salt, too. This cookie recipe borrows the wholesomeness of granola, using whole grain flours and rye grits – giving a great aroma and extra dimension of texture. And yet it’s still a good ol’ chewy chocolate chip cookie at heart. Perfect match for a tall glass of milk.

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