DIY Project: Malachite Pumpkins by Hank and Hunt

DIY Malachite Pumpkin by Jenny Batt of Hank & Hunt for Design*Sponge
[*For the next two weeks we’ll be sharing great DIY pumpkin decorating ideas from some of our favorite bloggers. Thanks so much to Jenny for kicking things off in style! xo, grace]

This summer I redecorated my living room with a Palm Beach-meets-Seattle vibe, but I still wanted to decorate for fall. Bright orange pumpkins always pop in a room, but not necessarily in a good way. So when Grace invited me to partake in her D*S Pumpkin Project, I instantly knew what I was going to do: malachite pumpkins! I’ve been faux malachite painting with watercolors for fun lately, and adore anything in deep green. So I drew my inspiration from the naturally luxe shades of stone and decided to give my pumpkins a little makeover. This may seem hard, especially for those new to painting, but I assure you, if you can twirl a paintbrush in an uneven circle (the wigglier the better) you can make these chic versions of pumpkins! –Jenny Batt of Hank & Hunt

Click through for the full how-to after the jump!

1 supplies
Supplies:
-two shades of “malachite green” paint, one light and one dark
-medium flat paint brush
-dark green acorn squash/pumpkins
-clear coat spray paint (optional but necessary if outdoors)

Steps:

1. Clean and dry your dark green pumpkins or acorn squash. I couldn’t find any dark green pumpkins, or even small white ones, so I used acorn squash. Choose squash that look more like pumpkins and less like acorns.

2. For brighter malachite, lightly coat your pumpkin in a mix between the lightest color paint and darkest. For darker malachite, just leave as is. (Note: if you can’t find dark green anything, grab a small regular pumpkin and spray paint green before starting.) Dip your brush in water, and dry on a paper towel before loading with paint. This will keep the brush from sucking up all the paint. Load the dark color on one side of the brush and the light color on the other side. Paint uneven circles with the lighter color in the center. Repeat in various sizes and shapes. Don’t worry if it doesn’t quite look right yet, this is your base. Let dry.

2 paint first layer

3. Once dry, load up your brush again with each color on each side and go back over your base circles with squiggles. Wiggle the brush a bit as you retrace the circle. You should start to see lines like malachite. Repeat on all the circles. Experiment with what color styles you like by adding variations or by painting lines with just the corner of the brushes. The best part is the more layers you have, the better it looks. Just remember to wait until each layer is dry to recoat, or the paint will blend into a solid medium green.

DIY Malachite Pumpkin by Jenny Batt of Hank & Hunt for Design*Sponge
4 paint second layer

4. Let cure over night. Spray with clear coat to keep the acrylics from sticking to your mantle. Voila. Simple and chic.

Thank you so much for having me Grace! It was truly an honor! Happy Halloween everybody! xo, Jenny

malachite pumpkin diy 2
malachite pumpkin diy 3

  1. Dannon says:

    This is awesome! Great idea :) Thanks for sharing and happy Halloween!

    Dannon

  2. Jandry says:

    Awesome idea! Did you use acrylic paint for this?

  3. Peaches says:

    Gorgeous! I keep these rout all year long :)

  4. amy says:

    Love this. I’m currently Malachite obsessed, will share on my Malachite Monday post!

  5. Laura says:

    So Cute! From prior experience I would just go ahead and buy fake pumpkins because after all that work you will be disappointed when they start to rot.

  6. kayse says:

    This is sooooooo beautiful!!!

  7. I love the colors! This is a lovely way to paint your teal pumpkin, too, if you are part of that project!

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