Hotel Nord Pinus-Tanger in Morocco

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If you’re reading this site, we probably have one thing in common (ok, we probably have many things in common): Morocco is at the top of our travel wish list. It has become a must-visit spot for most design enthusiasts and is a major influence on contemporary design. In addition to the already long list of beautiful places to visit in Morocco, there’s a new space to add to your must-see list: Hotel Nord Pinus-Tanger.

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Perched at the top of the Madina (the historical center of Tangier), Hotel Nord Pinus-Tanger oozes glamor. First built in the 18th century as a private residence, the hotel was purchased by French hotelier Anne Igou six years ago and then underwent a sixteen month restoration. North African fabrics and antiques are paired with contemporary furnishings like leather armchairs by Jacques Adnet and Charlotte Periand gooseneck lamps. But the real star of the show is the tile. The hotel is filled with traditional tile patterns – and they’re not just for the bathroom. There’s tile on walls, stairs and even on doors – in one room, I counted seven different tile patterns. My mind is spinning with the design inspiration possibilities!  -Amy

Image above: Traditional doors hand-painted by local artisans serve as dramatic works of art. 

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger
Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger
Image above: Brass door keys and just a sampling of the tile found throughout the hotel.

See more of this magical hotel after the jump!

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger
Image above: Chandeliers were salvaged from a Syrian mosque.

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

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Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

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Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

Hotel Nord Pinus Tanger

  1. Now I’m dreaming of far off lands!

  2. firehorse jane says:

    SWOON….

  3. tinajo says:

    Love this, have this kind of tiles in my kitchen. :-)

  4. Oh Moroccan style is one of my favorites! I’m so happy to get to go and explore several times each year on our retreats – and always bring back a bit of design for my house in the States. You can’t help but be inspired :)

  5. Marie says:

    How can you “find” a chandelier in a mosque?
    Does that word mean “steal”…

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      Marie

      No, it doesn’t necessarily mean steal. (If they stole it I highly doubt they’d tout that fact). Most buildings, when being renovated or torn down, sell building parts and decorative components at auction. From old hotels and churches to private homes and even old airports. I’ll send them a follow up question to ask, but I have a feeling that’s how they found the chandelier.

      Grace

  6. Oh, so beautiful… And all those mosaics.. Absolutely incredible. x

  7. casey says:

    Divine! I have such a soft spot for Morocco and their design motifs. I definitely still dream of renovating an old riad myself one day…

  8. Aaron says:

    if you like that hotel, you will love http://www.darseffarine.com/index.html . A medieval built Riad restored by a Swedish/Iraqi husband and wife.

  9. Annelise says:

    I also had a bit of a reaction to the ‘found in a Syrian mosque’ part. It’s a little strange to think that a hotel was procuring chandeliers from religious buildings in a war-torn country. However, I assume the hotel came by the chandelier honestly, maybe before the war began. It would be nice to clarify.
    P.S. The hotel Albergo in Beirut is also a wonderfully inspiring hotel full of gorgeous colour and pattern! http://www.albergobeirut.com/uk/hotel-beirut-site-officiel.php

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      Annelise

      I apologize if that line made you feel in any way like we would post something that glorified stealing historic or religious artifacts or objects. These items were purchased through a salvage/estate sale, much like when you see in American home tours that people have found floor or ceiling beams “from an old church in Vermont”. Religious buildings are often torn down and/or rebuilt and then the owners or builders sell no longer needed elements or building parts at auction.

      Grace

  10. Rebecca M says:

    Looks like a beautiful place to stay!

  11. Taylor says:

    This hotel: wow! I would love to visit Morocco some day in the future!

    xoxo
    Taylor

  12. Annelise says:

    Dear Grace,

    Thank you for taking the time to address this. I only mention it because of the civil war in Syria, which makes it more likely that buying something ‘salvaged’ from Syria right now – or anytime over the last three years – would be particularly sketchy (unlike something from a church in Vermont). I live in the Balkans and it’s heartbreaking to see how some people take advantage of conflict/post-conflict situations to get valuable historical items out of the country. I’m glad this was not the case here.

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      Annelise

      I completely understand and appreciate your feedback. I agree wholeheartedly- we would never want to post or glorify anything that was related to artifacts like that being stolen or taken during times of political unrest or war.

      Grace

  13. Lindee Levicke says:

    Visiting Morocco has always been on the top of my wish list! The Hotel Nord Pinus-Tanger looks like a tile-lovers dream come true. It would be great to put a Design Sponge group tour together to visit this magical spot. How about it Grace?

  14. Patricia Ramirez says:

    The city’s name is spelled Tangier.

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      Patricia

      Yes, which is how we’ve spelled it in the post. However, the hotel spells their name TANGER, which is how we’ve spelled it here, too.

      Grace

  15. E. Zaid says:

    Regarding the chandelier, I don’t know about this one in particular but let me tell you as a Syrian, The Syrian regime has stolen many of the valuable items from the Syrian heritage and old building including mosques and offered them in the black market. A chandelier may means nothing in value comparing to what has been stolen from the historical sites and sold around the world by the regime who took advantage of the revolution to accuse the public of doing such an awful act.

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