Human/House/Harvey: Forest Green

Human House Harvey, forest green
I’ve been traveling through the South for the past week and am truly in awe of the nature that surrounds this region of the country. From the changing foliage and glistening streams, to the towering pines and wild flowers, the South just has a way of captivating the senses. On my way up through North Carolina, I decided to take a drive through the Blue Ridge Parkway (if you’ve never driven it, I recommend it at least once in your lifetime!) and I was blown away by the immense pines and forest around me. So in homage to the natural beauty of the Appalachians, I decided to round up some favorites of the forest green variety for me, my home and my dog. –Stephanie

HUMAN – I’ve become a bit of a backpack fanatic and have started a collection. This delightful forest green one will be joining the group soon enough.

HOUSE – An armchair can really become the sole focal point of a room if you choose correctly. I love Anthropologie’s eclectic assortment of armchairs, especially this dark green, kilim rug upholstered option. So moody, yet charming.

HARVEY – As much as I’m a backpack fanatic, Harvey has gathered his own collection of jackets. (Believe it!) I know he’d probably have his eye on this casual hoodie for our evening strolls through the city.

photo source: endlessdogs.com

I’m lucky enough to have a pup who absolutely loves car rides. A jingle of the keys, and he comes running, ready to hop in the back and cruise the city streets.  So as I headed out east for a southern road trip, I gladly invited Mr. Harvey along – much to his delight.

Road trippin’ with your pup can be such a joy, but if you’re a bit timid or unsure about handling the car ride with your dog, here are a few general tips to help you out:

  • Get your dog acquainted with car travel. I’m assuming you are already aware of your dog’s like/dislike of the car, but if this is your first long journey with your pup I’d recommend getting them used to car travel by taking several longer drives prior to your trip and even feeding them in the car so they associate joy with the backseat. Practice makes perfect…or at least more tolerable.
  • Fasten those seat belts. There are so many safety harness, belts and seats that keep your pup safe in the car. I use a simple harness that attaches to the seat belt and allows Harvey to sit up or lie down with ease and gives me some peace of mind.
  • Keep your pup’s head inside the car. I know some dogs get such a thrill from letting the wind rush through their fur as they stick their head out of the car window, but it can be quite dangerous…especially at high speeds. So the best rule of thumb is to keep your dog’s head inside the car until you’ve reached slow speeds…and then they can enjoy a little wind action.
  • Be prepared for pit stops. Every  2-3 hours (or whatever you feel is best for your pooch) it’s best to stop for a break.  Be sure to have poop bags, water bowl and fresh water ready for your dog and see if it’s possible to fund an area where they can run around safely for a bit. It’s their vacation too after all.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. You never know what will come up along your journey and vet care is not always readily available. So I recommend packing a small pet first aid kit (most larger pet stores carry them pre-packaged) as preparation for smaller medical issues.

 

kendra

Another tip: make sure your dog’s ID tag includes your cell phone number and/or your home phone number with area code.

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