Garden Inspired Spring Wreath


Spring is finally here in the North East and we are so excited to see all the budding trees and spring flowers coming up. Since we are foragers at heart, this week is all about the flowers we have been able to gather right from our yards and from our local flower growers. Seeking an alternative to an arrangement, we thought we’d put together a spring wreath to highlight these beautiful blooms. This style of wreath is a great way to add a floral pop to an afternoon garden party or a spring brunch. Who can resist the sweet smell of lilac? -The Ladies of Forêt

We began by collecting a mixture of pieris japonica, dicentra (also known as bleeding heart), lilac, foxglove, plumosa fern, and smilax and repurposing a hog brush wreath as a structure. You can find pre-made wreaths like this at your local craft store, or you can make one with a wire structure and collected branches. We love the way the smilax wrapped around the brush as it would in nature. Next we cut the stems of the flowers and began to nestle them in the wreath, securing with wire when needed. Unlike other more permanent wreathes, many of the blooms in this wreath are not kept in water so the beauty of it is a bit fleeting. To extend the life of your blooms, add small water picks on the ends of stems and conceal them with greens or other blooms. When deciding what materials to use for this project, just look around your yard or neighborhood for inspiration. This project is just away to get you outside and observing the new life around!

 

  1. KD says:

    It’s a DIY without all the photos making it a DIY. How do I “nestle them in the wreath, securing with wire when needed.” and how do I ” add small water picks on the ends of stems and conceal them with greens or other blooms.”?

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      hi KD

      nestling merely means to place them in, where you see fit, and use wire to tie the stems to the frame.

      the water picks are optional, but you just jab them onto the ends- here’s a picture: http://www.visualphotos.com/photo/2×3094410/floral_water_picks_1788199.jpg

      grace

  2. Shari says:

    What a lovely combination of spring colors. I love the fine texture of the greenery and the soft colors in the blooms. So welcoming.

  3. Great idea to find inspiration in your own backyard!

  4. Kate says:

    This is so beautiful! Love the twiggy base.

  5. Hollie says:

    Wish I had a backyard to gather these beautiful bits in. I live in an apartment and the area is full with all azalea bushes. But this is a beautiful project! Maybe I can scrounge up bits of something… our doors in the hallway of the building are so bare and boring! This would most certainly help!

  6. kim says:

    Loved this mostly because it featured “backyardia” my favorite sources. Hollie, you could do this with azaleas- just snip a bunch of small branches and use wire to attach the ends of the branches towards the center of the wreath with the blooms facing out. As the post said it won’t last more than a day but what a nice idea for a party .

  7. the flower girl says:

    I’m with KD. this is hardly a DIY. I’d be able to make this wreath, I’ve been a floral designer for 25+ years, but this is ridiculous for a few reasons. one, the water tubes would be bulky, you’d probably need a minimum of a dozen. and they’d be hard/impossible to “nestle” without being seen, or for that matter, drip. in spite of the rubber collar around the stem, they aren’t leak proof. but the main issue is that this wreath would last about two seconds before wilting into a saggy mess. try leaving some lilac or fern on your counter for a half hour and see what it looks like. or experiment with foxglove and bleeding heart. the pieris might last a day, the plumosa maybe two, but it’d be shedding. this wreath is really pretty in the photo. a nice form, and a great palette. but forget about hanging it on a wall.

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      the flower girl

      of course i’ll post your comment- i’ve never had a problem with people disagreeing with things as long as they can speak without cursing or attacking people.

      i make wreaths on a pretty regular basis, so i personally don’t think this, or a modified version of this is too difficult to do. a floral wreath, much like the citrus wreath i made earlier in the year, is a short-lived object. as the post explains (“Seeking an alternative to an arrangement”) it has a limited life span and we’re merely trying to showcase other ways to display short-term flowers in a creative way. if it’s not for everyone, that’s ok. but my mission has always been to offer people as many creative ideas as possible.

      grace

  8. the flower girl says:

    I understand why you might not post my comment. I never comment on this kind of thing, but you’re really only setting your readers up for disappointment, and wasting a lice collection that belongs in water.

  9. Angeline says:

    I can see this as a great use for anything that your kids pick for (or with) you – It would be a fun way to display what they bring to you and a great way to discover more together …It’s a beautiful wreath, Grace!

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