DIY Haggadah Cover

I’m only a quarter Jewish and didn’t grow up celebrating Passover but luckily, I have a lot of friends who did. This year, beginning in December I started working on wrangling myself an invitation to someone’s Passover Seder. There is just something so special about the way older generations pass down the story and the family traditions. Many families have a collection of Haggadot that have been collected throughout generations. We created a paper cover with a family photo to unify the collection and to serve as place cards for the Passover Seder. You could also print out photos of each individual family member. It’s just a little way to make each person feel special and welcome. (And the cover can easily be removed after Passover) Happy Passover!  –Amy Azzarito

See the how-to after the jump!

Materials

  • decorative paper for covering the Haggadah
  • washi tape
  • family photos
  • twine
  • butcher paper or other brown paper to create a place card tag.

Directions

  1. Cover the Haggadot just as you covered your textbook in school. Measure your paper to fix each Haggadah, You can use tape to adhere the paper to the outside cover.
  2. Print out family photos sized to fit on the front cover of the Haggadah.
  3. Make photo corners using washi tape. Simply cut the tape into two squares of the same size and then cut again diagonally to create corners.
  4. Create a name card tag using butcher paper or other brown paper. Write the name on the tag.
  5. Wrap the Haggadah with twine and attach the name card tag

 

  1. Sarah says:

    This cover should include a secret compartment for snacks to help one make it through the meal. The floral paper isn’t for me, but it’s a great idea.

  2. Elisha says:

    Love this post! I am so happy to see a Passover DIY amongst all of the Easter posts that are to come. I cannot believe that Passover is less than 2 weeks away! Thanks for sharing!

  3. sophie says:

    ditto, elisha! my family has been using the same baskin haggahdot (classic) for years, but it might be nice to spice them up a bit! this would also be nice for those folks who are still using the maxwell house versions – great concept, not the best cover art ;) thanks a million!

  4. Suzanne says:

    Hey amazing Design Spongers! Why not do a feature on Passover crafts and activities for those of us who need ways to make Passover pretty and interesting and lovely? I love a good Easter egg but it’s a cool seder plate idea I am after!

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      hi suzanne

      we’ll try to include a wider range of passover ideas next year :)

      grace

  5. Genia Taub says:

    Hi Suzanne, working on a front cover for our Hagaddahs this year but mastered the Seder plate. A big success for us last year and I will continue my new Passover table setting is to have an individual Seder plate for everyone. There are different ways to go about this. Have all six things on a plate for everyone so there’s no need to pass but everyone can have their items in front of them and it all goes so smoothly. You can also use an Asian bento box- idea from Susie Fishein Passover cookbook. So cool! I’m all about presentation so ask away……….. Genia

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