Knitting DIY: Mary-Heather Cogar’s Heart Pins

Today’s knitting DIY comes from Mary-Heather Cogar, an Albuquerque-based crafter with a penchant for all things yarn! In addition to being the vice president of operations at, a prominent online community for knitters, Mary-Heather offers her knitwear designs on her personal website, Rainy Day Goods. — Max

Valentine’s Day is coming soon, but I think it’s always a good time to show a little wooly love! This easy puffy heart pin is a speedy, simple project — perfect for quick gift knitting or whipping up a fun treat for yourself. The back and front of the hearts are worked separately and seamed together, stuffed with just a bit of batting and embellished with a blanket stitch. Sew on a pin backing and wear your heart on your sleeve! Or your bag, your lapel, your pocket . . . — Mary-Heather Cogar

Full directions after the jump . . .



  • worsted-weight yarn, 15 yards/14 meters
  • small amount (about 1 yard/1 meter) of fingering-weight yarn in contrasting color for blanket stitch


Yarn Shown

  • Green Mountain Spinnery New Mexico Organic in Grey Red
  • Cascade 220 Superwash in Really Red
  • Miss Babs Windsor Sock Yarn in Peony (for the pink embroidery)



  • size 5/3.75 mm needles, or size needed to obtain a firm gauge



  • 20 sts x 20 r = 4”


Gauge isn’t crucial for this project in terms of getting an exact fit, but please do make sure that you’re getting a nice tight fabric with whatever needles you use. I recommend going down at least one size.


  • tapestry needle for weaving in ends and blanket stitch
  • 1.25” long pin backing (available at craft stores)
  • small amount of fiberfill or wool batting
  • sewing needle and thread for sewing on pin



  • k = knit
  • st(s) = stitches
  • kfb = knit into the front and back of the same stitch
  • k2tog = knit two stitches together



Cast on 2 sts.

Row 1: kfb, k1
Row 2: kfb, k to end
Repeat Row 2 until you have 16 sts. Knit 8 rows even.

Shape top of heart:

Row 1: k1, k2tog, k2, k2tog, k1. Leaving the rest of the row unworked on the left needle, turn.
Row 2: knit.
Row 3: k1, k2tog twice, k1. Turn.
Row 4: knit. Bind off 4 sts.

Rejoin yarn to the unworked stitches left on the needle to work the second half of the heart top as you did the first:

Row 1: k1, k2tog, k2, k2tog, k1. Turn.
Row 2: knit.
Row 3: k1, k2tog twice, k1. Turn.
Row 4: knit.

Bind off 4 sts.
Repeat entire heart, leaving long (6”) tails to use for seaming. Weave in ends on first heart.

Holding the two hearts together, and using the longer tails on the second heart, sew the sides of the heart together. I used a yarn tail to sew along one side until I got to the next end, then I wove in the rest of the tail I’d been seaming with, threaded the next long tail onto the needle and kept going around the heart in that manner. (If that seems confusing to you, just weave in the ends and seam the heart using a separate piece of yarn!) :) When you have about 1”/2.5 cm left to seam, lightly stuff the heart with some fiberfill or wool batting. Finish seaming the heart and tuck the remaining end inside.


Using a contrasting color and beginning at the bottom of the heart, work a blanket stitch around the entire edge of the heart: Insert your needle near the edge from front to back, pull the thread almost all the way through and then insert the needle in the loop from back to front. Pull the thread tightly to make a nice tidy stitch. Repeat these steps, working your way counterclockwise around the entire edge of the heart. Secure the end with a tidy knot and thread the blanket stitch yarn/thread inside the heart.


Securely sew on the pin backing to the back side of the heart — you’ll want the pin backing to be closer to the top of the heart than the bottom for the best balance when it is worn.

Enjoy your heart pin! <3

  1. Jen Giddens says:

    I am so excited to see a fellow Albuquerque crafter featured today! I immediately went to her website to send her an email, but discovered that the contact form on her website is broken, and I couldn’t manage to find an email address! Mary-Heather, would you please post your email address, or update the contact form on your website? Thank you!

  2. This is so cool. I really like your heart pins. I’m going to try it out this weekend.
    Keep on with the good work Mary.

  3. Mary-Heather says:

    Thanks Jen – I think I’ve fixed the contact page now. :)

    Thanks so much for sharing this pattern, lovely Design*Sponge folks! So excited!

  4. riye says:

    This is a great project and simple enough for beginners (like me) too! Thank you for sharing your pattern. :-) [And I love your stripey jacket too.]

  5. Ji says:

    Nice heart!!! I croched yesterday a heart for my little one. You can see on my blog. Amazing how many heart we are making for the valentinsday.
    With Love

  6. Ella Severson says:

    Beautiful little project! Also, love your nail polish! What is the color? Just the right shade for my v-day adventures

  7. mackenzie says:

    these are too cute! and kind of dangerous, i would definitely just put them all over my clothes. :)


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