Quantcast

flowers

Flowers Inspired by Gauguin

by The Ladies of Foret

Image above: Nature morte à l’estampe japonaise by Paul Gauguin

There is so much that can inspire floral design besides flowers — a drawing, a sculpture, weavings and textiles, architecture, the colors of a city, the movement of a field being blown by the breeze and even an album cover! We love looking to the works of past painting masters for inspiration on color, composition and feeling. Today, we’re focusing on Paul Gauguin, who famously introduced the use of pure, bold color to the post-Impressionist world. Looking at his work, we mimicked this vibrancy and tropical sensibility with burning bright fuchsia hyacinth, big leafy tropical greens, lotus-like safari sunset foliage, a single dusty poppy and winding fritillaria. Inspiration can be found everywhere, but there’s a reason this French painter was recognized as one of the greats! — The Ladies of Forêt

The full post continues after the jump . . .

Image above: Tropical Vegetation by Paul Gauguin

Image above: Self-Portrait with Émile Bernard portrait in the background, for Vincent by Paul Gauguin

Suggested For You

Comments

Leave a Reply

Design*Sponge reserves the right to restrict comments that do not contribute constructively to the conversation at hand, contain profanity, personal attacks, hate speech or seek to promote a personal or unrelated business. Our goal is to create a safe space where everyone (commenters, subjects of posts and moderators) feels comfortable to speak. Please treat others the way you would like to be treated and be willing to take responsibility for the impact your words may have on others. Disagreement, differences of opinion and heated discussion are welcome, but comments that do not seek to have a mature and constructive dialogue will not be published. We moderate all comments with great care and do not delete any lightly. Please note that our team (writers, moderators and guests) deserve the same right to speak and respond as you do, and your comments may be responded to or disagreed with. These guidelines help us maintain a safe space and work toward our goal of connecting with and learning from each other.