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Interiorssneak peeks

Sneak Peek: Katia Graeff & Family

by Amy Azzarito


Stylist Katia Graeff and her partner, Julien, a fellow stylist (but for clothes), live in Strasbourg, in eastern France. Their 914sf/85m2 apartment is located in an area that dates back to the 19th century, with the squeaky floors to prove it. Katia loves natural light and using white throughout their home as a sign of purity, while mixing in colors as a symbol of joy. Katia describes her partner as more “design,” while she prefers vintage and second-hand finds, but their two personalities work well together. In the four years they have lived here together, their home has seen multiple configurations, but then again, that is their field. You can find Katia’s latest work in textiles here, and her blog here. Thank you, Katia, and thanks to Estelle Hoffert for the photos! — Anne

Image above: The table is an extendable IKEA table that we repainted matte white (dulux valentine). The chairs are Eames, Moroso, Habitat and vintage. The horse, candlestick and mirror on the bookshelves were found at a flea market.


Image above: My partner fell in love with the Donna Wilson plates on the wall. The large mirror to the left leaning against the wall was a prototype that was presented as part of a collection for a former employer and that I was able to get for a good price!

More inside Katia’s home after the jump . . .



Image above: The coffee table is a spool recovered from a construction site that I painted white (dulux valentine). The highchair is a vintage piece. The sofa is covered with a white sheet that I change depending on my mood. The perpetual calendar ring is by Sebastian Bergne.


Image above: The poster is a vintage piece that we custom framed. The other frames are from flea markets. The wooden box was used in the ’50s to store grain for chickens!


Image above: An Indian deity of salvation who blesses all who enter our home.


Image above: I found this frame at the flea market, and the photo inside is by photographer David LaChapelle.


Image above: Our kitchen is a nod to the French West Indies. When my partner, who is West Indian, took me there, I was hooked by the incredible colors. I really wanted the kitchen to be a place where the atmosphere was lively and inviting.


Image above: [left] I hung bags and shopping bags on hooks from Ikea. [right] Aprons for lovers.


Image above: Newspaper rack from Emmaüs [France’s version of Goodwill].


Image above: The dresser, which I repainted white ivory, is full of antiques. My fabrics and sewing supplies are stored in the cupboards. The small ceramic bird perched on the dresser is from Habitat. The frames in the entryway are filled with a mixture of old illustrations and magazines.


Image above: Our office shelves and my partner’s toys at the top.


Image above: We are fans of shoes and had to find solutions for storage. Yes, each one is filled with shoes.


Image above: The wardrobe in my daughter’s room is a piece from my grandmother that I lacquered with floor paint. The table and chair date from the ’70s. My father gave it to me 40 years ago, and later refurbished it for my daughter. The picture on the wall is a canvas that I painted in 2006. To highlight the bird house, I painted a candy pink rectangle in the background. Overhead there is an origami paper lamp with cable thread.


Image above: We made the changing table ourselves with varnished pine that we set on a row of kitchen units. We use storage baskets to hold diapers and other baby accessories. The frames are from IKEA; they were raw pine and painted white for freshness. The illustrations are by Darling Clementine. We pinned our daughter Rose’s name to the wall with tiles we that brought back from our recent holiday in Majorca.

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