sneak peek: evan & oliver haslegrave


Three years ago, brothers Evan and Oliver Haslegrave moved into a raw space in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The brothers had founded a building and design company called hOmE, an anagram of their names and those of their sisters, Hadley and Morgan. They’ve designed and built commercial spaces in New York City such as the restaurants Goat Town and Paulie Gee’s, as well as a cafe for Van Leeuwen ice cream. Their own home in Greenpoint provides the perfect canvas for their building experiments. When they moved in, all that existed was the bathroom. They were able to build out everything else in an effort to maximize their working space — the carpentry shop is just off the kitchen, and rather than waste space with a sofa, there are comfy armchairs and a hammock for relaxing. Thanks, Evan and Oliver! — Amy Azzarito

All images by Jennifer Causey

Image above: This was a sign that we found at Build It Green. We believe it came from a movie set. It was too big to bring through the hallway, so we took out the window, and with a lot of ropes and willing friends, we managed to get it in.

See more of Evan and Oliver Haslegrave’s Brooklyn apartment after the jump . . .


Image above: The croquet mallets came from a flea market, and after some editing and a lot of fabrication, it all came together. It was not something that we initially intended to be a chandelier. (See the croquet chandelier in progress at The Makers Project.)


Image above: Shower curtains can be somewhat like cleaning yourself in a bag, so we used some old windows we had to prevent this feeling. We found the sink at Build It Green.


Image above: The corner doors conceal the apartment’s sleeping nooks.


Image above: The long table we built to be a door in our old loft, and in our current home, it found itself to be a table. The chairs were given to us with the wire already attached by a friend.


Image above: We found the doors in a factory in upstate New York. We really love half-light doors, so they might not end up in any of our projects.

  1. Kay Perret says:

    If I could live in an urban loft I’d want it to look just like this. Definitely one of my favorite spaces you’ve ever posted!!!!!
    Thanks for bringing it to us.

  2. Zee says:

    Beautiful, natural home by two beautiful men. Grace, your constant defensiveness is exhausting, off-putting, and, at least today, largely unwarranted (comment about “we don’t all have kids”).

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      Zee

      I think the constant comments people make about “well this isn’t safe for kids” and “clearly no kids live here” are offensive and I’m tired of them. So yes, I speak up about those. This is my site and I have the right to defend people who are being judged by unfair standards.

      Grace

  3. Maura says:

    I’m wondering if either of the brothers wants to marry me…maybe? …please?

  4. Jen says:

    Love this place. And the two brothers reflect it so perfectly. Thanks for the share and inspiration! Jen

  5. dana says:

    All that wood….AWESOME!!! Love it!!

  6. orlando says:

    What’s with all the isolated detail? The details are of course beautiful, and some close-ups are always welcome for rhythm and perspective, but it’s hard to get a sense of what the space is like. After the first 3 photos it’s like paging through a catalog. Here’s a cute vintage hammer. Here’s a cute bolt. a pick axe. jars.
    Having said that, I’d love to keep seeing more “dude” spaces in the future.

  7. Moira says:

    Very cool. I love it.

  8. Esther says:

    Looking at this space had a similar feeling to watching a scene from Portlandia. Feels like every man in Brooklyn has a beard, every restaurant using the same designs and of course two brothers with a design firm would have an apartment like this. Is there any creativity in Brooklyn?

  9. Charlene says:

    I think what a person does or does not like about design is subjective. Very much so. I think opinions that are expressed should never be considered “offensive”. Only the manner in which they are expressed could be considered in this light. Some of the people who love this website do have children…and that is part of what we consider when we look at design. just like color or style of furnishings or period of architecture. It’s ok if others don’t…but some do and shouldn’t that be fine? This blog allows viewers to make comments. Comments are about what we see. This is what we are judging…not people… :)

  10. malkosh says:

    nice! but dont rust and dust affect ur health?

  11. Sol Ines says:

    Love! and the place is good either! jajajaja Love the beards! hmmmm

  12. Sam says:

    “”This is my site and I have the right to defend people who are being judged by unfair standards.”” I’m afraid I agree with Zee and Charlene…I find the defensiveness and labelling of people’s comments as offensive is judgemental and myopic…mums and dads and non-mons and non-dads read this blog and I would like to think that everyone has the freedom to comment in a respectful manner without being rapped on the knuckles for it. The space is indeed raw and refreshing…very nice.

  13. Jill says:

    hOmE is an acronym, not anagram :-)

  14. Alis says:

    I love the Dickensian man-cave assemblage, it’s really genuine and gratifying in essence.

  15. What I love about this project (DesignSponge in general) is that it gives us something to aspire to. Not everyone will like everything, nor will it suit every lifestyle, but certainly there is inspiration to be had by way of play on textures, using the banal in a whimsical or refreshing way, and just plain seeing something you don’t see everyday. I love this project because it speaks to the phenomenal talent of these artisans and their courage/creativity to do what others wouldn’t think of or would be too shy to do. Bravo.

  16. The natural wood in your home is perfection. The exterior of our home is log. I find something so soothing about natural materials. There really is nothing like them.

    Thank you for sharing!

  17. Aunt Mim says:

    All toll, I thnk this is one of the best spaces I’ve ever seen! So creative and homey. I wish I could start over again here at my home and accomplish some thing close to this!

  18. Sonja says:

    Wow, that place has soul. Seems to be organic and curated at the same time, but mostly just reflective of the people who live there. I am curious as to what the stickers are from around the mirror.

  19. snowlion says:

    I am with Charlene. I love this place, and were I without children would love something similar myself (but less dust) it feels old, warm, interesting and inviting, but alas for me it is danger! (which is right for this home and it’s occupants). Maybe something to aspire in another part of my life.

  20. Slvana says:

    An example to follow .

  21. ron says:

    What a beautiful home! It feels warm. I always wanted a hammock at my place

  22. Amy Bielawski says:

    Love it all, including the cute guys! Wish they’d come here to fix stuff up for me ;)

  23. Still confused about the old windows as shower curtain… do they open… how does this work?

  24. Camille says:

    I feel like I would need a tetanus shot before I walked in this place.

  25. Savage Seeds says:

    Perfect and inspiring!

  26. john says:

    a lot of money and time went into this place. I’m glad the boys design business is going so well, so they can pay their parents back.

  27. Rena says:

    Could you give us some tips on how you sealed the windows for the shower? I’ve had a similar idea and went online to get some tips and can’t really find any. Thank you!

  28. jacquese says:

    well guys back in the day this was pop-ular, now its called old school. of course, i love it, the current word they call eclectic. for me, solid wood floors and an expression from the heart is exciting. keep on doing your work, the feeling is spreading!

  29. Blaise says:

    Rena you can use a marine sealant. A silicone caulk would work just fine.
    http://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/How-to-Select-Sealants-and-Caulk

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