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Interiorssneak peeks

sneak peek: refinery29 office

by Amy Azzarito


We’ve been working on getting the Design*Sponge office in shape, so I’ve become particularly curious about other office spaces. Refinery29 is one of my daily reads and certainly one of my favorite fashion sites. So I was pretty excited to get today’s peek into their office. They just moved their 70-person team (whew!) to this space in New York’s Cooper Square. The old office space was jokingly referred to as “the batcave,” so they wanted to emphasize the light, airy feel of the new space. The site’s co-founder, Philippe von Borries, explained that they worked with designer Chad McPhail to create a space that “balances clean-lined minimal elements with more rustic industrial materials to create a neutral canvas” to be filled with color and pattern. The result is an office space that feels decidedly unoffice-y. Thanks, Philippe and the Refinery29 team! — Amy Azzarito

All images (unless otherwise noted): Ingalls Photography

Image above: We wanted the reception area to have a warm, inviting feel. The black material on the low wall is a Forbo cork product, and the wall is capped with reclaimed lumber, a construction detail found throughout the office. The rug is from Paul De Beer, a private dealer in Persian Rugs — he sold us one of his last rugs before retiring from the business! The Arthur Umanoff-style wicker chairs are from Horseman Antiques, the reclaimed wood and steel table is from Haus Interior, and the vintage Moroccan pillows are from Imports from Marrakesh, Ltd.


Image above: This area is for informal meetings. The sisal rug is from Crate & Barrel; the sofa is from Form in Dallas, Texas; the Danish safari chairs were found on eBay; the round solid oak table is a Bas van Pelt design from Holland sourced from David Duncan Antiques; the plants and pots are all from Plantworks, Inc. around the corner from our office; and the roller shades are from Smith & Noble.



Image above: Guang Xu

See more of the Refinery29 New York office after the jump . . .



Image above: It was important to us that we had a room where we could brainstorm freely, and we wanted all the walls to double as whiteboards. You can even write on the glass walls, so sometimes the space has 360-degree scribbles! The table is a custom design by our interior designer, Chad McPhail, made of black Formica and reclaimed lumber built by Ernie’s Carpentry. The chairs are from White on White. The white board paint on the walls is by IdeaPaint.


Image above: Another meeting area with a custom-designed table by our interior designer Chad McPhail, made of Formica, steel, and reclaimed lumber and built by Ernie’s Carpentry. The vintage bentwood chairs are sourced from Cove Landing. The light fixtures are Matt Gagnon Prototype Lamps from Future Perfect. The wooden “R29” sign was given to the company by our founder, Philippe von Borries’ mother. It was made by her artist friend out of shipping pallets. It was brought from the former office and given a prominent spot.


Image above: We wanted open rows of desks with areas for people to pin up their inspirations. The workstations are Formica, reclaimed lumber, steel, and sanded homasote built by Ernie’s Carpentry. The Orbit Chandelier is a Patrick Townsend design from Areaware.


Image above: When we were building this room, we joked with the carpenters that this was where we sent people who needed to calm down and that we needed the walls padded so they wouldn’t hurt themselves. Really we just wanted a quiet room where people could make calls. The walls are covered in egg-crate packing foam. The chair is a late 19th-century folding chair from Cove Landing.

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