I’ve been hunting boucherouite rugs for ages now. My search continues, namely because the common price point for antique boucherouite rugs is well beyond my budget. That said, I keep looking on the off chance that someone on eBay or Etsy will sell one for a steal. West Elm recently started selling one-of-a-kind rugs from Morocco, and I just noticed a section for boucherouite rugs . . . under $500! While they’re on the smaller side (approx. 4 x 7 feet), they’re still stunning, and for a seriously time-intensive handmade rug, they’re well priced. Because they’re one of a kind, you don’t get to pick your style, but if you did, that purple sucker (or the harlequin/diamond style) would be mine. Click here to check out these boucherouite¬†rugs on West Elm and order online.¬†xo, grace

  1. I’ve heared of these…how are they made….fabric scraps pulled through a burlap backing? Are they silk? That would feel dream underfoot.

  2. christine says:

    They look homemade….not sure about the patterns but love the colour. x

  3. Christina Newhard says:

    These are gorgeous. Any chance the good people at design*sponge can find a DIY tutorial on these?

    I’ve been working on making rag rugs at home (crocheted) but these are especially lovely.

  4. shara says:

    i am lucky enough to have bought some of these in tangier. they are all kinds of fabric scraps. i bought ours for approx 20$, but brining them back on the plane cost an arm and leg. also- they do especially well in the washing machine!

  5. Brin says:

    Moroccan Boucherouites are common utilitarian rugs made in all regions of Morocco woven of recycled cloth, most often cotton clothing and other various fibers. Some of the patterns are more extreme artistic examples, while others take on a more traditional aesthetic. Many Berber homes use them in entryways to ward off negative energy and evil spirits.

    It’s worth noting that West Elm’s most recent Moroccan “found” story are all newly woven carpets, so do not have the value of a vintage piece. As a dealer of vintage Moroccan carpets here in Brooklyn, I’m pleased they’re shedding light on the beauty of Moroccan carpets but the entire collection is new, hence lacks the character and soul found in vintage pieces.

  6. Terry says:

    consider making your own. it’s not hard and then you can have several.

    1. Grace Bonney says:


      High quality boucherite rugs are anything but easy and simple. DIY rag rugs are possible but these are an entirely different venture and if you’ve ever seen this type of rug- or the actual process- in person you’d know to suggest a DIY version is pretty much impossible. We’ve seen this done in person and it takes an incredible amount of skill and craftsmanship.


      1. Laura says:

        I just started making one this weekend! It does take a lot of time and effort, but it’s totally worth it! And the work itself is fun and creatively rewarding since you’re turning something unusable into something new and useful and beautiful. Grace, it’s obviously not impossible to do it yourself because the people who make these do it themselves too! And they don’t make their first rug already having “an incredible amount of skill and craftsmanship.” I say go for it! If you put the work in, the skill and craftsmanship will follow, and you’ll have something gorgeous to show for it!

  7. julie cullum says:


    I live in Morocco and am always hunting for AND finding boucherouite and beni ourain rugs and handira (aren’t I lucky!)
    If anybody wants to see photos, please feel free to drop me a line

  8. Bouly says:

    I feel you! I’ve been searching for an affordable boucherouite for ages, I finally found amazing pieces on , they have amazing rugs! I literally wanted them all! They also gave an Instagram page ‘carpetenvy’.


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