glen grassi’s micro-home

I love micro-homes. Mainly because living in NYC for almost 10 years has made me terrified to live in a “normal” sized suburban home. I don’t know what I’d do with all that space; I’m used to cramming everything into less than 1,000 square feet. But these mini-homes look like a great way to see the country without leaving all the comforts of home behind. This sweet mini-home built by Glen Grassi is insulated on all four walls, the ceiling and the floor to withstand a blizzard. So if you wanted to pack this bad boy up and travel to Alaska, you’d be set (even the shingles are rated to withstand hurricane winds). The interior has a chimney and a stove and a portable solar panel that helps you stay off the grid as much as possible. I love the idea of packing into this guy and hitting the road. If you’re interested in taking the plunge, click here to read more about Glen’s homes. You can even take it home with you if you’ve got $16K burning a hole in your pocket. Thanks to Amanda Kavanagh for the tip (via Skinflint Design)! xo, grace

  1. This is amazing! I love the way these mirco homes challenge me about how much stuff I really need. I would love to see one in person!

  2. iamnoskcaj says:

    I love it! A few months back I read about another guy doing this. He actually sells the plans, teaches classes on how to build them yourself, OR you can buy it pre-built and ready to live in / travel with.

    Check it out:

    FYI, I’m NOT related to the project/company. I just read about it a few months ago and it’s stuck with me all this time. Just like you, I am now used to smaller spaces thanks to NYC, and really think this is closer to sustainable sized living for the masses (not the one you linked in particular, but some of the others you’ll see on that website).

    Love your blog and twitter feed. Been a subscriber for quite some time.


  3. Jeni says:

    OMG! it doesn’t even have a full size door! how cute :)

  4. Andrea B says:

    So cute! But you’d better not ever gain weight from what you were when you built it. That door looks tiny to squeeze through as it is! (My favorite part is the chandelier in the corner. Oh my word. Bliss.)

  5. Ruth Singer says:

    That is stunning! I very nearly ended up living on a 50×8 foot canal boat, so I had to really think about compact living. I’ve now got a 2 bedroom house stuffed full so I can’t quite imagine living in a tiny space anymore…

  6. Naomi Thompson says:

    This is nothing new – we have these all over Minnesota and have for years and years…..except here we call them “fish houses” …and they have holes in the floor….for fishing ;)

  7. Elaine says:

    Any house that has a big painting of a tree on a wall is good in my book… Sweet!

  8. Nathalie says:

    I love that it’s small and yet doesn’t scrimp on style. Love that chandelier too! And the wall art.

  9. Rachel says:

    I love it. There are some beach huts down from where I live, facing the water in a little row. Very similar in size to this. There are people who live in them year round. I don’t know if I could hack it but really, it’s amazing how little we truly need in comparison to what we have.

  10. Rachel Tatem says:

    What a beautiful use of wood! So lovely

  11. Katy says:

    I live in the Philly suburbs close to Terrain :). We have a 900 sq ft twin. Whenever my mind starts thinking about a larger home, my husband reminds me, “pretend we live in NYC, and this will feel like a mansion”. So true!

  12. Sommer Roman says:

    this is terrific. rustic, cute, humble & stylish!!

  13. MABSOOTA says:

    CUTE! This reminds me of playing house in refrigerator boxes as a kid and how cool it was to “live” in such a small space. I’m with you Grace; living in a large suburban house would freak me out a little.

  14. What a cool idea!
    It is so tiny, yet has been thought through and still has an intelligent use of materials.
    Thanks for the inspiration!

  15. Wow, I almost can’t believe this is real! In my mind these little trailers make me think of ripped vinyl, gross carpet and smelly mildew BUT this is So cute! What a great way to go camping. Job well done!

  16. layne says:

    I have lived in what would be considered a “micr-home” (12′ X 16′ cabin with lofts – or, rather, it was once a shed that we finished out with insulation, trim, flooring, etc…) for going on 3 years now and I love it. You don’t have to sacrifice personalization and design simply because your space is teeny-tiny (thankfully!). We (my future husband and I) have lusted over re-laimed space buildings for awhile now. We call the largest floorplan (1240 square ft), the “reclaimed space castle” and are saving to some day buy it for our property. Oh to dream.

  17. Laura says:

    And wouldn’t it be much nicer to bring this along with you rather than those giant RV’s? Super lovely.

  18. That’s so amazingly cute and such a good use of the space. I can’t believe either how stylish it is inside, I want one! :)

  19. Laura says:

    That mini home is really cute! It brings back childhood´s fantasies and makes my adult heart beat in a kid´s way – everything is possible. It doesn´t matter if it happens now (instead of 25 years ago when I dreamt about it) – it matters that things do happen :-) And it is nice to see the world with kids eyes again :-)

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  21. April says:

    Hmmm…love that the tiny house trend is catching on, but people – we’ve built our tiny house for less than $5k and we’re pretty comfortable (granted, it’s still under construction). It can be done a lot cheaper than $16k if you’re willing to put in the time and effort.


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