wind paintings


If there’s a single thing that keeps me working in design, it’s that moment when you look at something for the first time and it simply takes your breath away. That’s exactly what happened when I saw these beautiful Wind Paintings from artist Bob Verschueren. Verschueren worked in the 1970s and 80s using wind to create these stunning landscape pieces. Each work would focus on a material like iron oxide, yellow ochre or burnt umber, which was then laid out in linear patterns on the land. Verschueren would let the wind move and blow the pigments around and create an altered version of the shape that represented the stunning collaboration between man and nature. Though these pieces were created years ago, Tom at I Love Belgium is celebrating them on his fantastic blog and was kind enough to send them my way. Click here to check out more of Verschueren’s work online; it’s the sort of artwork that makes me want to throw this laptop aside and run outside. xo, grace


More images after the jump . . .


  1. Yonghui says:

    even though he started this work in the 1970s, i’ve never heard of this concept and it’s so refreshing! an amazing combination of beautiful landscape and art.

  2. Thank you for showing this, just amazing concept and visuals!

  3. Trina says:

    Beautiful.

  4. b says:

    hey grace, i love this post and yesterday’s on lubok . . . they are excitingly different from the ‘put a bird on it’ trends. i still read d*s daily, and trends are important to understand too, but being exposed to more like these two posts leave me quite inspired in a new way — the content feels smart and more mature. and, more importantly, i think you’re exposing young creatives to some very thoughtful design. keep it up!

    1. Grace Bonney says:

      Thanks Blair- those posts are definitely more my personal style these days so I’m glad you like the change in direction- I’m trying to post more like this without abandoning the style I loved before :)

      G

  5. Cammie says:

    Absolutely gorgeous. I am reminded of a smaller scale project by Andrew Mowbray where he built a contraption that held a pen, then left it on top of a roof for a certain amount of time and let the wind “draw.”

    http://andrewmowbray.com/images/Tempest%20Prognosticator/Large/drawing7.jpg

  6. I love these. It’s such a fresh and elegant approach to both landscape and abstraction. The ephemeral part, I feel, also gives them a sort of romantic air. Thanks for the inspiration.

  7. Melissa Arries says:

    Love the concept. Would be even more interesting if we knew what kind of wind was blowing? Cool Breeze or blustery and wind speed? Just a little background. (I’m a scientist, can’t help myself).

  8. emina says:

    wow…. tnx a lot for this post at exactly the right time!

  9. liza jane says:

    Gorgeous! Were these before Andy Goldsworthy? Kind of the same vein.

  10. Jan says:

    I was thinking that too – I love Goldsworthy. I’ll have to find out more about Bob Verschueren now.

  11. Alethea says:

    It’s incredible that one edge is always so controlled and clean. I would not have guessed that wind travels in such a precise and consistent direction. Wish I knew more!

  12. Celia says:

    the iron oxide is amazing, such a clean line reflecting the wind direction. i absolutely love the dimensionality of this work. it’s inspiration for 2D pieces and what i can accomplish in my home. i was thinking of Goldsworthy also. please keep adding these posts.

  13. Anthea says:

    As someone who lives in the New Zealand capital known as the windy city. These are an inspiration.

  14. susy says:

    Loving all of the posts, lately…new territory is so exciting! I especially enjoyed this one. It’s really great to see abstract art get a shout out. And, the idea that one can make art out of something atypical – so inspiring and creative. I love that this “design” is all about ideas. Thanks! : )

  15. Dustin says:

    Fascinating

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