Interiorssneak peeks

sneak peek: hillary petrie of egg collective

by Amy Azzarito


To enter this light, airy New Orleans apartment, visitors must pass through a small communal gate, then a beautiful shared courtyard and finally onto this bright space. Each apartment in the complex has a porch overlooking the courtyard, and it’s the perfect place to wind down after a long day. Egg Collective designer, Hillary Petrie, has lived in this charming Southern apartment with her roommate, architect John Kleinschmidt, for nearly four years. It’s proven to be the perfect retreat from their busy lives. I love seeing shared spaces that prove that living with roommates doesn’t mean sacrificing style. Thanks, Hillary & John! — Amy A.

Image above: The butcher-block prep table came out of a hotel kitchen in St. Louis, Missouri, and is perfect for entertaining — it’s where people tend to congregate. It also weighs nearly 300 pounds! This portion of a porcelain sign seems to be the result of a business name-change — I assume they removed the “Inc.,” and kept the rest. I picked this up at my favorite New Orleans thrift store, the Bargain Center. The wooden chair belongs to my roommate, John Kleinschmidt, and I love its detail. His father salvaged, refinished and caned the piece, as well as a similar one in the workroom.


Image above: The bed is DWR “Min,” and the blue dresser is one of my favorite thrift store finds — it came from an old girls’ boarding school.

The full sneak peek continues after the jump!


Image above: This is my favorite room in the house, as all the doors can be opened to welcome the lovely courtyard below. Photograph by Andy Sternad


Image above: My prized Zulu coconuts are displayed on the credenza — they are a coveted throw each year in the Zulu Mardi Gras parade. Wall art is Algue by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec. The orange chair is another thrift store find and, according to a plaque on the underside, came out of a Church’s Chicken office!


Image above: This vignette features my roommate John Kleinschmidt’s collection of lovely objects: The white tile is from the Alvar Aalto museum in Jyväskylä, Finland. He brought it back after traveling all over Scandinavia and Finland. The tiles are called “halla,” the Finnish word for “frost.” The original tiles started detaching from the building and had to be replaced — this is one of the originals and is a reminder of how incredible the tiles looks in the low Nordic light. The clay tile is from the roof of a building in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, that John is currently working on with his architecture firm. It’s a Ludowici tile, stamped from their Chicago factory in the 1920s. They still make tiles, and John’s firm will use them in their renovation. The giant light bulb was rescued from this same building. John also rescued the orange chair from a school auditorium renovation. The artwork is mine.


Image above: Photograph by Andy Sternad


Image above: The mirror is an Egg piece, and the chair I recently fell in love with. I can’t decide if its ugly or whimsical, but I adore it nonetheless. It’s very feminine in its design and scale, and everyone who sits in it loves it, too.


Image above: Photograph by Andy Sternad


Image above: This is a lovely place to end all dinner parties.

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