sneak peek: myriam balaÿ-devidal


After a hectic life in Paris, Myriam Balaÿ-Devidal and her family decided to pack their bags and move to Nîmes. The southern France city known for 200 days of sun a year is located between sea and mountains with close proximity to Provence, and it quickly became the perfect home. The apartment, with spectacular high ceilings and old charms, is where the family works, plays, paints, grows, dances, cooks and welcomes friends. With a background in industrial product design, Myriam has moved toward working with textiles (I’m crazy about her lamps), and her exquisite eye is clearly behind this beautiful home, which immediately caught our attention. Mille mercis, Myriam (who is also the photographer of her sneak peek)! — Anne

Image above: Inside the room of my oldest daughter, the ambiance is one of Asian flowers and dragons. The wallpaper is by Osborne & Little, the wood shutters were painted golden yellow and the small paper lamp is one of my creations. The bedspread is by Petit Pan, and the dragon pillow and sheet were purchased in the Chinese quarter of Paris.

Image above: The bathroom has a Moroccan feel. The curtains and bathmat are from Chez Caravan Chambre 19 in Paris. The small mirrors, basket and slippers were found in the souk in Marrakesh (see more here). The towel was a creation by our collective, Copirates. The tiles that cover the wall behind the bathtub are from an old factory in Villeneuve les Avignon. The bathtub is from the 19th century and was found on the internet and painted bright orange.

Image above: This shows the south side of our living room. The round, wool carpet was purchased at Emmaus, and the large cushion is by Robert le Héros. The Scandinavian chair from the 60s was an eBay find. The sound sculpture is a museum piece from Macrosillons.

Image above: The parents’ room. The walls are painted with white lime. The authentic fisherman’s stool from the 60s serves as a bedside table. The bed is covered with a striped blanket that I created and wove with a weaver in Madras, India. The silk pillows were made with fabric bought from a weaver around Saint Etienne (the industrial center of France). The black and white vase is from the set of a film I worked on as decorator 20 years ago. The plaid throw on the radiator is from Khadi & Co purchased at Caravane, Paris.

Image above: Bedroom detail of a garland of fabric flowers against a blue-green painted wall (paint by Emery & Co).

Image above: Detail of wall in living room left raw with paper and pearl flowers I made.

Image above: In our second daughter’s bedroom, we left the walls rough and added a wallpaper butterfly I created. The little objects on the wall are memories of our travels. The old bed frame was repainted in Chinese red and was purchased at a flea market in Barjac (Launguedoc Roussillon — a giant “brocante,” which happens at Easter and the 15th of August). The red pillow is from Zara Home; an old sheet was dyed chewing-gum pink, and the small pillow is Petit Pan.

Image above: The garden side of the kitchen. The walls are painted green absinthe (paint by Emery & Co), the chair attached to the wall is by Laurent Rump and the red tile floor is original to the house. The second-hand chairs were painted to bring alive the colors of the garden. The family table is made of a small table and we added a larger board to the top. The water pitcher and carafe are by Nelson Sepulveda.

Image above: The guest room. Like most of the apartment, the walls are left raw. The bedding colors are soft, and the blue and white clover quilt was a find at a brocante in Provence. The white summer blanket is from Chambre 19, Caravan in Paris. I dyed the old curtains blue and lilac. The polka dot Scottish pillows are one of my creations. The vintage chair was recovered with a floral fabric, and the red metal lamp was found at a flea market in Nîmes.

Image above: Our 19th-century staircase. A cluster of newspapers is suspended from the first floor. An second-hand umbrella holder is on the landing.

Image above: Detail of the desk in my daughter’s room. On the desk is the book Martine Fait du Cheval (both of my daughters ride horses, which this region is great for). The lamp is from Habitat, the little metal robot was found in a beautiful boutique for kids in Montpellier and Zoe made the cardboard container for her collection of bracelets in every color. On the raw wall there are little red dots (recall the spots on the butterfly), an old slate board, a map of France, a sack of alphabet pearls and a frame by Copirates.

Image above: The staircase near the walk-in closet leading up to our room. On my coatrack from a flea market in Berlin are bags I created (with the exception of the bird bag, which is by New York designers Ross & Carney). My hats and shoes are arranged by season.

My favorite thing to do at home [translation] is to drink a glass of Chardonnay with friends after a day of work.

  1. starr says:

    ooops all caps but you can read it quietly…

  2. Dana says:

    what is the paint color in the bathroom?? i absolutely love it!!

  3. janet says:

    Myriam Balay is brilliant with patterns (and colours, but patterns are even more difficult) I just love these rooms.


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