brimfield 2011: wicker, rattan and cane


Aside from the recreation, equestrian and travel trends at Brimfield this year, we also noticed the popularity of woven rattan and wicker pieces. I’m not normally a big wicker girl, but I loved the movement away from really dark woven pieces and toward something lighter in color and weight. We’ve chosen some of our favorite pieces above and below, but if you noticed any great rattan and wicker at the show, please feel free to link to your photos in the comment section. I’m still kicking myself for not buying those amazing black/tan chairs above. They were $750 for the pair, and I thought I could come back and haggle the seller down to a more reasonable price, but sadly, they were gone in the blink of an eye. To whoever bought them, please let me come sit in them some time? Please? xo, grace

There’s more Brimfield coverage here (what we bought), here (recreation trend), here (textiles), here (equestrian trend), here (lighting), here (travel) and here (leather).



Image above: Kate fell in love with this beautiful woven rattan-seat chair above. The square plate in the chair’s back is actually copper.

CLICK HERE for 7 more beautiful rattan pieces after the jump!



Image above: Though I never would have guessed it, this piece’s seller identified it as a vintage Heywood-Wakefield chaise. I loved the woven rattan/cane seat.


Image above: These sweet woven baskets would be fun to mount in an entryway to use for outgoing mail, etc.


Image above: This light used a mix of burlap and rattan strands to create a loose shade.


Image above: We loved this little striped basket hiding in a corner.


  1. Holyoke Home says:

    I think the setting (foggy fields early in the morning) really lends itself to wicker and the like. I’ve always seen lots of this kind of item at Brimfield!

  2. Norine says:

    Habitually Chic just posted about a source for french cafe chairs very like the first picture. She blogged about TK Chairs who supply chairs to almost all the french cafes in Paris and have done forever. Her post is amazing and the resource is more amazing yet.

  3. oh I am such a sucker for a basket!
    love those chairs {top pic}
    want

  4. erin says:

    I just found a chair that looks just like the one in the second to last photo. I’m always on the lookout for rattan chairs and I was so excited to finally find one…and at $5, it was a steal! My favorite part about rattan is how easily it fits into an outdoor setting.

  5. Sarah says:

    I love the 2 baskets with the flaps and that light! what great finds!

  6. Love that wicker chaise!!!

  7. Jessica says:

    Love that light!

  8. EngineerChic says:

    I love wicker! Sadly, both of my cats (1 present, 1 past) have loved it as well. It seems that grassy, twiggy texture is just purfect for sharpening one’s claws. I’ve even caught the current feline going after the plastic wicker deck furniture (yes – I did buy it and it has held up quite well, just proof that sometimes ugly = durable).

    But I love to look at wicker & have missed hitting Brimfield since I moved to eastern Mass. Maybe next spring I’ll make the pilgrimage again.

  9. Molly says:

    Oh those black & tan chairs – be still my heart!

  10. Kate says:

    Love, love, love wicker. And, although I almost kick myself to say it, macrame and shells. It adds such a nice natural element to glossy whites and metals.

  11. I am obssessed with campaign chairs right now, the one with the iron back is fantabulous.

    Love wicker, and objects made with woven grass. Beautiful texture.

  12. Jenée says:

    You’re kicking yourself for not spending $750 on rattan chairs that look like they’re worth about $10??? How hard would it be to pick up the basic frame (which you can find pretty quickly at a thrift store), fix the caning and stain it the exact same as the chairs in that picture?

    1. amya says:

      Jenée – Fixing caning is actually a pretty difficult process – particularly caning involving the sort of detailed patterning found on these chairs. These chairs were one-of-a-kind pieces with pretty fantastic proportions. -Amy

  13. Thanks for adding the photo of the large rectangle light fixture which I designed. It is actually made with a loosely woven jute. See more of the “jute collection” of pendents, sconces, and floor lamps at http://www.splurge design.com

  14. Jenée says:

    I was offering a suggestion on the extreme low-end of things (finding a used chair with the same basic shape and repairing any broken caning) but rattan is generally inexpensive so I think you could find a nearly-comparable chair brand new in the $50-100 range. I just think those chairs look kind of cheap and if something looks cheap, it should be cheap.

  15. barbara says:

    the simple rattan chairs with black metal legs are identical to one I got for $4.99 in 1965 at the Akron store…a chain that has long since been out of business. I was a teen and doing my room with a tropical theme…

  16. Lisa says:

    I think Grace should be kicked for not buying those chairs! Lesson learned – next time you see something that wonderful snatch them up!

  17. Coach tote says:

    Oh, it is made by hand!!!!!

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