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anne ditmeyerinterior designInteriorssneak peeks

sneak peek: lynne testoni

by anne


Australian wallpaper manufacturer and designer Lynne Testoni of Moore & Moore wallpapers lives in a two-story Victorian terrace house in inner-city Sydney, Australia, with her university-aged daughter, Isabelle. Lynne spent 20 years in food and lifestyle magazines before working in corporate marketing and launching her own business, her most exciting adventure yet —and the scariest! She works from home, cutting up wallpaper samples for designers, and her house and the media on her desk are an eclectic collection of furniture and accessories from all periods of her life, including second-hand finds, souvenirs picked up from travels all over the world and lots of wallpaper — both on the walls and in rolls around the house. Thanks, Lynne! And thanks to her friend and photographer John Paul Urizar, one of Australia’s best lifestyle photographers, for the shots! — Anne

Image above: This is my bedroom, which is a lovely and serene retreat — I picked one of my favorite wallpaper designs, the Gum Leaves in Silver and Grey on Soft Grey as the starting point for the room and kept everything else very simple, including a white bedside table and lamp. I do love the pretty David Austin roses, though. My sister Diana is a florist at Flowers By Teresa, and she is always putting together pretty posies for me. I am very lucky!


Image above: I have always loved my red front door! It’s one of the things that really attracted me to this house. The bookcase is an antique found in a warehouse nearby, and the screenprint is a famous Australian cartoon icon, Ginger Meggs by Martin Sharp, which I bought more than 20 years ago as a fund-raising project for one of Sydney’s early theatres, the Nimrod. I found the cute letter holder on a trip to Paris.

CLICK HERE for more of Lynne’s Australian home!


Image above: I love my dining table, which has a zinc top and is developing the most marvelous patina as it ages. It took me a long time to decide on dining chairs to match it, but I eventually settled on Thonet’s No. 18 chairs, and I feel their elegant simplicity works well with the table. The painting is by Gary Baker, an old friend who does a lot of florals. It’s called Grevilleas and features some beautiful native Australian flowers. Again, the wonderful Flowers By Teresa pulled together the floral arrangement to echo that in the painting. We painted the room ourselves — it’s Icelandic Stone by Porter’s Paints, which has a small amount of red pigment in it to pick out the red elements of the painting.


Image above: I think this stairway is my favourite room in the house! I have completely covered the surrounding walls in the Flannel Flower Damask design in black on white and it is so striking. I haven’t had a visitor to my home who hasn’t gone “wow!” It was a bit of a brave decision to go with such a strong pattern, but I have never regretted it. Shady Designs custom-made the drum light shade using the same wallpaper and black fabric, which makes it even more spectacular.


Image above: I work from home and this is my office space . . . I found this old French school desk in an antique store in Sydney, and it has a zinc top, which I love. I collect postcards of Paris every time I visit (it’s my favourite place in the world), and they are part of my inspiration as I email, chat and write on the computer. And don’t you love the telephone? It’s an old phone from the 1970s that my mother gave me — I call it the Marcia Brady phone.


Image above: This old industrial antique was originally a shoe rack in a factory, and I have trekked it around from house to house as I have moved over the years — I think I have had it for about 20 years now. I love it, and it now serves as the perfect space to store some of my wallpaper samples, which I use to send to interior designers, architects and the media. And, again, one of the Thonet No. 18 chairs — they are beautiful, aren’t they?


Image above: I live in the inner city of Sydney, and as such, there’s not a lot of outdoor space. However, last year I built a simple deck out back, so I can entertain friends and family outside when the weather’s lovely (as it often is). This outdoor setting is particularly special to me because my father restored it for me just before he died a couple of years ago. He and I found it in a junkyard, and he spent about three months in between chemotherapy working on painting, sanding and rebuilding this setting. I love it. It’s my favourite colour, too.


Image above: This is my sitting room. I found this classic 1940s lounge in a second-hand store and fell in love with it instantly. The design is of flannel flowers, which was a common Australian symbol of the time, and I used it as part of my inspiration for the Flannel Flower Damask wallpaper design. The diptych was my first significant art purchase and is by Willy Sheather, an artist based in Wagga Wagga in the Australian bush. Called Bush Symphony, it was inspired by the Peter Sculthorpe symphony of the same name, and when I met Willy, she told me that she played the symphony as she painted it. I love the galahs [birds]! Shady Designs made the shade for the floor lamp in the Coral wallpaper design in taupe.


Image above: This is me in the spare room and my office, where we decided to wallpaper an alcove in the Coral wallpaper design in soft pink and add shelves for a bookcase. The daybed is used as a place to relax (did I mention that I love to read books a lot?) during the day, or as a spare bed when we have guests to stay. I also had Shady Designs do another custom-made light shade in the room in the same soft pink wallpaper design to tie the room together.

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