diy project: jessica’s postage stamp coasters


I’m getting ready to go running off to complete the zillion post-holiday errands I have on my plate, but I decided I simply must add the supplies for this project to my shopping list. Jessica is a graphic designer by trade, which is clear to see from her choice of prints for these adorable coasters that she whipped up in no time.  Jessica found these images on the flickr site of Karen Horton. Karen has amassed a treasure trove of amazing images of old postage stamps and labels. With a few simple materials, Jessica fashioned these “jumbo stamp” fabric coasters, complete with perfectly pinked edges.

This is the perfect project for a laid-back weekend, especially because Jessica and Karen have graciously made the stamp designs available for download. I can’t wait to make little sets of these for holiday gifts as I huddle next to my space heater:) Thank you for sharing your awesome project, Jessica! And thank you to Karen for sharing your images as well. —Kate

CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump!

Materials:

  • White felt
  • White cotton fabric
  • Iron-on transfer paper, available at office supply stores
  • Postage stamp images
  • White thread
  • Computer and printer
  • Iron
  • Scissors
  • Pinking shears
  • Pins
  • Needle or sewing machine

Instructions:

1. To make the coasters pictured here, download the printable 2-page PDF and skip to step 3. If using your own images, scale each postage stamp to approximately 4″ x 4″.
(note: images in PDF are reversed so they will transfer properly)

2. Reverse each stamp to create a mirror image. Many printers have a setting called “flip horizontal” that will reverse the image, or use your software application’s settings.
3. Print the stamps onto the iron-on transfer paper.
4. Following the instructions on the transfer paper package, iron the images onto white cotton fabric and remove the paper backing.
5. Pin the printed fabric to the felt and stitch around the edges of each stamp image.
6. Trim the stamp with a pinking shears to create a border with a perforated look.

YOU’RE DONE!

  1. elizabeth says:

    Back to report on the iron-on vinyl:

    It works beautifully! Just be sure you’ve washed the fabric first. Iron on the vinyl before you sew, use a 90/14 needle and you’re set.

    I love this project! Thanks !

  2. Anna says:

    I can’t seem to download the full how-to – these are great and I want to make them!

  3. BaliTidBits says:

    Hi, I’m so glad I found your website from http://www.dreamesh.blogspot.com :) Mom is a fan of postage stamp and I’m 15, looking for something that is quite easy & simple for me to make :) thanks for the amazing DIY(s)! :D

  4. Sara Glover says:

    I love this project and really want to do it but I don’t see how to download the PDF File, could you help please

  5. Susan says:

    What a wonderful idea! It’s got me thinking in all kinds of directions … with photos from a wedding shower, graduation, or other special event. Or photos of special friends through the years. Even my own miniature quilt blocks scanned and printed. Oh, the possibilities…and in time for Christmas!

  6. That is so awesome! I love to own those postage stamps coasters. I collect postage stamps all over the world and this would be a good addition.

  7. Lyn says:

    I believe I have just found something I HAVE to make for my stamp collecting, hard to buy for dad. :)

  8. Cynthia A. says:

    For some reason I had trouble removing the paper backing from the transfer paper. I was wondering if I would have to start again when I realized paper dissolves in water. The transfer seemed well adhered to the plain fabric so I simple soaked it in warm water for a bit until I could pull/roll/peel it off. Dried the fabric with the transfer and proceeded. Worked like a dream.

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