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2010 scholarship voting: part 1 (undergrads)

by Grace Bonney


The time has finally come to vote for the 2010 Design*Sponge Scholarship finalists! Today we’ll be voting twice, once for undergraduate finalists and once for graduate student finalists*. Today we’re starting with 10 undergraduates first- in total, they are 20 of the most talented students I’ve seen in a while! These top 20 10 undergraduates were chosen out of a group of 600 applicants, all of whom showed great potential. Thank you so much to everyone who took the time to enter- the next generation of designers definitely looks bright and talented and I can’t wait to see what they do next. Voting begins after the jump! xo, grace

*I want to give the undergraduate voting a little time to breathe so the graduate student finalists and voting will start around 4pm this afternoon. Both polls will be open through Wednesday of next week

Please note all students’ names are linked to their portfolios so you can see more of their work and find more information on the work shown below

UPDATE: Voting will end next Wednesday, December 22nd at 10pm EST

A big thank you to our sponsors this year: Glos and Room & Board. Glos has kindly provided our first place prizes for both undergraduate and graduate students, Room & Board has kindly provided our second place prizes for both undergraduate and graduate students and The Monacelli Press has generously offered to sponsor our Honorable Mention prizes for the 2010 Scholarship.

CLICK HERE TO VEIW THE FINALISTS AND VOTE AFTER THE JUMP!





Images above: Work by Ange-line Tetrault




Images above: Work by Christopher Stuart





Images above: Work by Jessica Wei




Images above: Work by Hyeonil Jeong




Images above: Work by Elizabeth Clark





Images above: Work by Luke Shuman





Images above: Work by Carlos De León




Images above: Work by Beth Ann Cott





Images above: Work by Misha Kahn





Images above: Work by Anders Wallner

PLEASE VOTE (ONCE) FOR YOUR FAVORITE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT DESIGNER

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Comments

  • Excellent job, Grace! It was hard to pick just one. Maybe
    someday you will have enough funds to have a scholarship for each
    category (id, graphic, illustration), so we won’t have such a hard
    time choosing between them all. Because, you know, it is all about
    US, lol. I love that you do this for these students.

  • grace,
    i love design*sponge and i love the scholarship you are offering. I only hope that one day i am in a financial position where i could offer such a gift to someone.
    happy days :)

  • This was a difficult. So much great talent.

    I find myself separating industrial and product design from graphic and package design.

    (ASIDE: Grace- I’m certain you may have already thought of this, but I am going to share it any way: Perhaps offer one award for visual and another for product/industrial?

    Just an idea. Though, as I wrote, I’m sure you have already thought of this.)

    That said, my runners up were:
    Jessica Wei
    Luke Sherman
    Carlos De Leon
    Hyeonil Jeong
    Anders Wallner

    Such good work here – and the portfolios were a pleasure to peruse. Really, I wish I had a product or a need that required the hiring every one of these talents.

    Thanks for giving us the chance to choose. You could have kept the decision in-house. I appreciate being given the chance to vote.

    Thanks, Grace.

  • Grace, I am just wondering when the results will be posted.
    Thanks for all of your hard work!
    Happy Holidays!

  • After reading through these posts and looking at all the work I have mixed feelings. I was indeed impressed with the projects shown by the students and glad to see the thriving Design Sponge community rally around aspiring designers. It’s so important as a student to feel recognized and have opportunities to show work beyond the classroom. As a former recipient of this scholarship, I really want to thank Grace and the rest of the DS team for continuing to support design education

    I do however feel the need to chime in regarding this debate money/resources vs. talent. In my experience and not just at the college I attended, the design school environment is extremely competitive, people are willing to do what ever it takes to churn out the best possible work, including going into VERY large sums of debt in order to see a project is done correctly(not to mention on time) AND stay up sometimes up to 36 hours straight until completion. Money is not the magic ingredient that creates a great design, it is the idea behind it along, with determination, craftsmanship, execution, intent and talent. I think in the end it is never completely a black and white question money vs. talent but a confluence of the aforementioned factors that result in successful projects. I had classmates that outsourced their models to China or had them completely fabricated by professional manufacturers but these were not necessarily the best projects in the class. They were definitely well made and beautifully painted but the but good craftsmanship and a nice paint job can’t save an average design. It’s my opinion that very good work is a result of something more than just money and talent.

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