DIYdiy projects

diy project: pillow shams

by Amy Azzarito


this fun guys sewing project (brett will be back for sewing 101 next week!) comes from jacinda of prudent baby. {thanks for sharing, jacinda!}

In my home we have a strict 4 pillow (2 per person) rule in our bed. So I came up with a solution for having pretty pillows that you can still sleep on. This design is unique in that there is not a seam down the middle on the back. You could even use a different fabric on the back for a semi-reversible pillow, which might make it feel like having even more pillows, right? –Jacinda

CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump!

What You’ll Need:

The sizes listed here are for a king-size pillow. You can easily alter the dimensions by measuring a pillowcase that fits your pillow and adding 5″ to the height and width.

For one king-size pillow I used:

1 piece 26″ x 36″
1 piece 26″ x 35″
1 piece 26″ x 9″ (I sewed the narrow leftover strips of fabric from the other two pieces together to make this third piece, allowing one pillow to be made from 1.5 yards of fabric total. Since this piece is mostly hidden, it worked great.)

Steps:

1. Along the 26″ length of the 26″x9″, fold over a 1/2″ seam, iron, fold over 1/2″ again and iron. (2 shown.)Β  Ignore the seam down the middle, that is where I patched the fabric together.


2. Along the 26″ length of the 26″ x 35″, fold over a 1/2″ seam, iron, fold over 1/2″ again and iron. (2 shown)


3. Straight stitch hem on both pieces approx 1/8″ from inside edge.


4. Lay down 26″x36″ piece with right-side-up and lay 26″x35″ on top, right-side-down, aligning the 3 raw edges.


5. Now lay down the 26″x9″ piece right-side-down, aligning the 3 raw edges on the opposite end.


6. Pin all around and sew 1/2″ from edge all the way around. If your machine has a setting for automatically stopping with needle down, this is a great time to use it. When you get to a corner, lift the foot, turn the fabric using the needle (in the down position) to hold it in place, then lower your foot and continue sewing the next side.


7. Trim a bit of fabric from all four corners.


8. Make sure you remove ALL pins at this point. Turn your piece inside-out and use a pointy object (crochet hook works great) to make sharp corners.


9. Iron your outer edge. I use a piece of cardboard inside the pillow to get a nice straight edge.


10. Pin the pillow all the way around approximately 3″ from the edge.

11. Starting along the short side of your pillow (the side with the opening.) Begin 2″ in and 2″ from the side. Your stitch will be very close to your opening but do not sew your opening closed. When you get 2″ from the end of that side, use the method mentioned above to turn your corner.


12. After you turn, sew entire length. stopping 2″ from edge. You will sew across the opening slit on this side, make sure all layers are flat and straight.


13. Repeat for the last two sides. You will meet up where you started just after crossing over the opening for a second time.


And you’re done! Except that you probably need to make a pair, unless of course you have a strict 1 pillow policy, then you really are done.

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