sneak peek: yvette laduk


dutch designer yvette laduk works and meets clients from her waterfront home, so she likes to joke that she lives inside her own portfolio. when she and her partner bas, a contractor, first found this bungalow in alphen aan de rijn, netherlands, they knew it had potential. with their combined design expertise, yvette and bas gutted and refurbished their new home to create a space that would be a beautiful for both living and working. the final result was a space with an open layout (that worked for their lifestyle) with a sleek yet playful feel that reflects yvette’s work and style. be sure to check out all 20 images after the jump and click here for additional and full-sized images. {thanks, yvette!}anne

[photography: henny van belkom / van belkom produkties. descriptions: simone van heiningen]

Louise Hederstrøm’s “Wire Tree” coat rack hangs in the home’s entryway.

The ‘Forever Flowers’ knitware on the large and smaller vase was designed by Yvette, while the knitted flowers were made by Yvette’s mother, Hilde Laduk.

The sofa was designed by Stephan Bleeker for Sur&Plus.

The dark wooden floors are made of burnished oak, which runs through the majority of the house. Yvette opted for a darker brown color to ensure warmth. Comfort is at the top of Yvette’s list of priorities, so she selected cozy polyurethane foam dining room chairs by Marcello Zillani that sculpt to your body when you sit. The candelabra against the wall was designed by Roderick Vos.

CLICK HERE for the rest of Yvette’s peek after the jump!

The ‘GlowBlow’ lamp over the dining table is by David Design. It’s made of parachute silk and has a fan inside! When you turn the light on and the fan starts working, the shade bulges out. The circular objects on the wall in the dining area are not, as one might think, pieces of art. They are actually radiators!

Yvette and Bas designed as few internal walls as possible to keep the space feeling open. The vast living room was created by covering what was originally a patio with a glass roof, which – combined with floor to ceiling windows looking out over the terrace and garden – creates an immensely light and airy space. Though a lot of hard materials like stone and wood were used, Yvette paid special attention to color and texture in order to create a warm atmosphere.

What looks like a entire wall of laboriously stacked slate, was actually not that difficult to create. Yvette explained, “These are in fact stone strips, which come in block-shaped ’tiles’.” The same system was used in the bathroom, with mats that have pebbles attached to them. “You simply stick them to the wall and once the walls are completely grouted, the pebbles look like they have been individually pressed into cement.”

The hanging fireplace in the living room was designed by Kees Marcelis.

The low ‘cabinet’ below the flat screen TV is actually a radiator, designed by Yvette. “I want to combine form and function in my own work. I recently designed an air-conditioning system with units that look like huge table lamps, cut in half lengthwise and stuck against the wall.”

Yvette at work in her office- the lampshade was made based on one of Yvette’s own designs.

The hanging steel bed in the master bedroom is another of Yvette’s designs, made possible by Bas’s technical know-how. It is suspended from one of the supporting beams in the ceiling and safely secured in an exterior wall. “I love the famous floating bed designed by Dutch architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars that hovers over the floor by means of a magnetic field, but it costs over one million Euros! Still, I admire someone who designs something like that, knowing that he probably will sell only a few of them.”

The heated towel rail and ‘Woody Wood’ carpet were designed by Yvette.

Yvette designed the plant containers made from rusted steel to accommodate two cloud trees. The ‘Puppy Sit on Dog’ was designed by Eero Aarnio for the Me Too collection by Magis.

The ‘Bird Treehouse’ made of corten steel and wood is a design by Kodjo Kouwenhoven for Maandag Meubels. He personally gave the first one produced to Yvette.


Design*Sponge reserves the right to restrict comments that do not contribute constructively to the conversation at hand, contain profanity, personal attacks, hate speech or seek to promote a personal or unrelated business. Our goal is to create a safe space where everyone (commenters, subjects of posts and moderators) feels comfortable to speak. Please treat others the way you would like to be treated and be willing to take responsibility for the impact your words may have on others. Disagreement, differences of opinion and heated discussion are welcome, but comments that do not seek to have a mature and constructive dialogue will not be published. We moderate all comments with great care and do not delete any lightly. Please note that our team (writers, moderators and guests) deserve the same right to speak and respond as you do, and your comments may be responded to or disagreed with. These guidelines help us maintain a safe space and work toward our goal of connecting with and learning from each other.