sneak peek: asia gwis

by


three years ago graphic designer asia gwis and her husband sebastian (and 2 dogs and 3 cats) found this amazing 80 year old former schoolhouse in the countryside of poland. they moved it to warsaw where they restored it. the exterior remains an old, black cottage, but they’ve designed everything on the inside themselves, and filled it with treasures they have collected over the years. the hard work has paid off, and today we have a sneak peek inside. click here for many more images (in addition to the post), and you can find more of asia’s work here and here. {thanks, asia!} -anne

[above: Our living room is currently black and white. The old floor is painted in white.  I like this “giant” lamp very much.  The couch is from Ikea, the tv table was made by my husband. The picture is by a friend of my husband, the very talented young polish artist Swanarts.]


Our kitchen is mainly furnished by Ikea except 3 chairs: one is Eames, one inherited from my grandmother, one (stool) found in the building and restored by my husband. The table is still under construction.


Our fireplace, with wooden wall, and head of the black horse. We placed stones found in our garden in front of fireplace.

CLICK HERE for the rest of Asia’s sneak peek after the jump!


Old oak table was bought at the flea market (very heavy) and mix of chairs (ikea, inherited from grandparents, and eiffel chair. In the corner is a sweet lamp with a red cord from Habitat.


Chalkboard paint on door of closet under the stairs. It’s very helpful thing in our home because we forget about everything very often. In the background our lovely dog Fika. The stool was made by my husband.


View from the living room to the kitchen and stairs. We bought this stool from Ikea because in the old house the ground floor was lower than here, and as you see it could be a little problem with first step ;-)


Part of our living room. Bed from ikea, tv table made by my husband. On the floor our cat Koksik.


Ground-floor bathroom. Figures were inherited from my grandmother. The lamps are from a building market.


Shower in the ground-floor bathroom. Black-glass, spanish mosaic tile, with white concrete floor.


First floor. Tapestry is from Ikea, designed by my favourite designer Hella Jongerius (thanks to Ikea I could afford to by something designed by her ;-) Our bedroom is in the background.


View from our bedroom – bench made by my husband, on it one of my favourite pictures of Audrey Hepburn shot in 1956 by David Chim Seymour.


View of my office. The white table is from my grandmother, the red one is from Ikea. The table top was made by me. The lamp is from a building market. The floor is industrial parquet making it more affordable.


Part of my inspiration wall. It’s a collection of many things: illustrations, old polaroids of me and my husband (from beginning of our acquaintance),  a portrait of Dalai Lama, sheets of old calendars…


First-floor bathroom. The picture is a table-cloth embroidered by my grand-grand mother many years ago.


First-floor bathroom with simple bath inspired by Jacqueline Morabito.


Mirror with our “treasures” – folk birds made of clay, fire breathing nun…


Bedroom


Main entrance to our house. Hanger from Seletti was a wedding gift from my workmates at the editorial office i worked in some years ago.

  1. Shaikh Mubin says:

    Good Interior

  2. anna elisa says:

    I agree with ADA:

    “(…) very calm and efficient except the religious figures by the double sink, especially in the bathroom. i’m not religious, its just screams awkward.”

    Choosing a bathroom to place a piece of decor, be it a figure considered as sacred by some or be it a grand grandmother’s embroidery work, might show kind of disrespect or underappreciation. I mean, no one would sit a Van Gogh’s painting on the bathroom’s wall, right? There are great pieces especially made for bathroom decoration. Even many other among the pieces shown in this home would have worked wonderfully in the bathrooms, instead of those in discussion.

    .

  3. Aleksandra says:

    This is an example that in Poland you may find good design, but still great majority of projects are really biased. Unfortunately, it is not easy to find well designed interior with with a soul. Most of projects are completly raw without any character. So the greater congrats for Asia!

  4. jessica says:

    this space is wonderful – i love that it was an old schoolhouse! the mixture of chairs around the house is great, our designer at red will often do this in clients homes at the dining table, she likes to include a bench on one side. very inspirational space – thanks for sharing!

  5. Loving the exposed wood! Such a great contrast with the white. Thank you for sharing!

    xx

  6. madlyn easley says:

    Why not a Van Gogh in such a beautiful bathroom! The religious figures are perfect as is the whole house. I have never seen a black and white scheme with such warmth.Love it!

  7. Jack R says:

    Love that chalkboard paint idea. Would be excellent for me as well as I tend to forget a lot of things these days. I also like the bathrooms.

  8. Emily says:

    The New Modern Classic

  9. Ceiling says:

    Wow this place looks amazing! Modern and minimalistic :) Beauty of black and white combination :)

  10. Helen says:

    Two-toned but thousands of character types…thank you for bringing this one back to the future…

  11. leslie kingery says:

    One of my very fav sneak peeks…agreeing with all of the comments…so stunning & warm.

  12. bafomet says:

    Amazing place, looks very comfy!

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