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icff 2009: the british are coming (lighting)

by Grace Bonney

alright, first things first- i loved so many of the hanging pendants i saw in the british design section. i also loved their wallpapers (more on that later), but i wanted to kick things off with these incredible pieces by chun wei liao and daisuke hiraiwa.

based in the uk, both designers experimented with creating hanging pendants from non-traditional materials. i was seriously impressed with chun wei liao‘s cardboard pieces- they actually come flat packed and then you can fold the decorative faceted elements (each of which is printed with a delicate floral pattern) into the tables or pendants to create more detail. i spent a good amount of time in this booth (along with a writer from one of my favorite sites, core77– that’s her hand above) just staring at each of these little faceted cardboard pieces- they were sturdy, functional, fun and a wonderful spin on the idea of flat-packed pieces. click here for more information on chun wei liao’s work.

next up is designer daisuke hiraiwa, who created beautiful hanging lighting from disposable plastic utensils and toothpicks. for the plastic utensils, he used a soldering iron to burn tiny holes into each piece- creating a lovely dotted pattern with the shadows.

for the toothpick pieces, he used glue to hold all the pieces together allowing the unit to bend and fold freely.


CLICK HERE for 3 more lighting designers after the jump!

designer mai oersted was behind these beautiful glass chandeliers. i loved the little red elements inside the clear glasses that gave the fixture and overall red hue. very nice.

sonodesign created these beautiful acrylic pieces. the units themselves are actually quite light- and each hanging acrylic piece comes off easily so the piece flat-packs in the mail.

these colorful wire lights were from british collective deadgood.

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