diy project: kate’s ceramic planters


i have opened up my collection of old knick-knacks to a world of possibilities with a wonderful gizmo: the multi-purpose drill bit for use on ceramic, porcelain, glass, tile, etc. they come in various sizes and allow you to drill holes in bowls, plates, cups, pots, you name it. having noticed a depressing lack of variety for hanging planters out there, i decided to make a custom one by drilling holes in a pretty pot. click here for the full post and instructions- happy crafting! -kate pruitt

click here, here, here and here for kate’s recent diy projects on d*s

What You’ll Need:
1. drill
2. drill bit for ceramic, tile, porcelain in two sizes: 7/32″ and 3/8″
3. old pot, cup, or bowl
4. twine
5. glass of water
6. scrap wood or cork to drill into
7. plants

Directions for Hanging Planter:
1. Clean pot and dry completely
2. Placing the pot directly on top of the scrap wood, drill a drainage hole in the inside of the pot at the center of the base with the 3/8″ drill bit. Ceramic drill bits get very hot, so you’ll want to periodically splash a little water on the hole to cool it off. It also takes a little time to drill through, but be patient, it will go through and create a clean hole.
3. Next, drill three holes equidistant from each other on the sides of the pot near the top with the 7/32″ bit. Go slowly when you get near the end of the hole so the outside doesn’t chip.
4. Wipe pot clean and thread twine through holes.
5. Knot twine at top at the length you want the pot to hang down.
6. Place your plant in the pot and hang in desired spot.

VOILA!

NOTE: I’ve done some research on the ceramic drill bit and while it is very effective with most types of ceramics, it can chip or crack items sometimes depending on the fragility and age of the item you are drilling. I don’t recommend trying this with an irreplaceable heirloom or expensive treasure for this reason.

  1. judy dunworth says:

    In my garden that twine would rot pretty quickly and the whole thing would fall down. Perhaps something more substantial would be better – There are some good looking synthetic twines I use in my garden – they last a long time and look good too – I don’t have brand names and probably found the one I currently have at an art supply store.

  2. Rachel says:

    These are so much fun! I’ll be linking to this in the Daily DIY.

  3. Shelley says:

    I love this idea. I can’t wait to make these for my mom’s garden. Great gift idea too:)

  4. cindy says:

    oh man! i’m going to go out and buy one of those drill bits ASAP!! I have so many i’d like to fix/alter

  5. Elissa says:

    I love this idea! You could also substitute small chains from the hardware store for the twine.

  6. Jeannie says:

    You could use “fishing rod wire” to make a secure, if invisible, hanging implement if twine or wire would soon rot in your environment (as it would, in my salty climate. Twine or something else would be cuter but invisible fishing line would be strong enough and would let you highlight the cuteness of the hanging pottery and plant inside it. I think I’ll try it. Thanks for a great idea I think I can actually DO. Being craft-impaired as I am.

  7. I look forward to adding this idea to my garden,time to get the drill out!

  8. LuauNow says:

    Just reinforce twine of your choice with fishing line.

  9. Clarissa K says:

    This is so great! I have been looking everywhere for non-plastic hanging planters, wondering why no one but me wants them. THANKS so much for this idea, I am going to get this drill soon. :-)

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